| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter RSS Feed

Civic Impact

CMU grads develop smartphone case to prevent sexual violence



After three roommates at Carnegie Mellon University each had friends fall victim to sexual violence, they decided to do something about it.

Alan Fu, Jayon Wang and Siri Ramos founded the company Lifeshel after they graduated in October 2013. The company’s first product is called Whistl, a mobile alert system smartphone case that emits sound at 120 decibels that can be heard up to 300 feet away. The sound is comparable to the level of noise from a rock concert. The case, when partnered with the Lifeshel mobile application, will alert the case owner’s family and authorities that they are in trouble.

“This product is important to us because we feel the problem deeply,” says Ramos, the company’s chief technology officer. “While attending school, all three of us had close friends that experienced sexual violence. This made us realize that this problem doesn't only happen to friends, and that it could just as easily happen to our siblings, parents, and children. We’ve created this product for them and anyone else who has experienced sexual violence.”

Ramos added that sexual violence is a topic that has been gaining attention in the media and is hopeful this increased publicity will help incite change and that Lifeshel can help.

“In the past few months, the problem of sexual assault has finally been gaining massive media attention,” says Ramos. “It is a welcome sight to see people taking action to stop it. However, it is a problem that has existed in our society for way too long. Lifeshel aims to protect people and communities via our brand and our smartphone cases. Our cases are the equivalent of a home or auto security system except for your person.”

Although there are traditional forms of self-protection like whistles or pepper spray, Ramos believes that Lifeshel products are more likely to be carried by individuals and can harness the powerful features of smartphones to aid in the case of an attack.

“Whistl is always on your smartphone, so it is always on you,” says Ramos. “In our age of constant connectivity, hardly anyone forgets their phone. In fact, most people always know where their phone is 24/7. This is in stark contrast to traditional self-defense solutions that get buried at the bottom of purses or left at home.”

The mobile application Lifeshel has developed will work in conjunction with the case to send automatic notifications to loved ones, friends and police when the alert noise is activated and will also include features like location notifications, a strobing flash to disorient attackers and automatic sound and video recording to be used as evidence.

“Our app and network will enable helpful locals to protect their community against sexual assault,” says Ramos. “This means that if you are ever in a panic situation, people on our network will be able to get to you and help you, even before the police can. This will be the difference between actual prevention versus simply dealing with the aftermath of a painful event.”

The Whistl smart phone case and Lifeshel mobile application are currently in the prototype phase of development. They hope to start testing the prototypes with college students in Pittsburgh.

After successfully launching Whistl, Lifeshel hopes to develop additional personal safety smartphone cases like a case that includes a pepper spray feature without being bulky or cumbersome.

More information about Lifeshel can be found at www.lifeshel.com or by following the company on Twitter at www.twitter.com/lifeshel.
 
Signup for Email Alerts
Signup for Email Alerts