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CNN documents Pittsburgh's robot renaissance

CNN is the latest news outlet to report on the local robotics industry, with reporter Maggie Lake interviewing Mayor Bill Peduto, Seegrid Corporation President David Heilman, and University of Pittsburgh’s Chris Briem about Pittsburgh’s tech sector.
 
“Pittsburgh: A once-gritty steel town transformed into a booming tech hub and a leader in the robot revolution,” Lake says.

Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Institute has spun off more than 30 companies, employing over 1,000 people in the local economy, according to Lake.

Catch the robots in action here.
 

BBC Popup covering Pittsburgh in November

The British Broadcasting Corporation’s mobile bureau is coming to Pittsburgh in November to report on the stories that make our city pop.

The journalists from across the pond want to hear what stories matter most to us, so they’re inviting students and residents to a community meetup at 7 p.m. on Nov. 3 at Carnegie Mellon’s Newell-Simon Hall 3305.

The BBC Popup will travel to different locations throughout November to create video reports based on the issues that matter most to Pittsburghers. The video stories will be broadcast on BBC World News television and online at BBC.com/popup.

Learn more about the BBC Popup project here.

A Luxury Travel Blog shares Pittsburgh's top five treasures

Looking for the lap of luxury in Pittsburgh? The finest elegance in the City of Steel can be found in five exquisite places, according to A Luxury Travel Blog.

Among the treasures: the Grand Concourse Restaurant, The Frick Art & Historical Center, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, the Fairmont Pittsburgh hotel, and Wigle Whiskey.

“A beautiful city of contrasts full of grand historic sites mixed with modern dynamic sites firmly rooted in the future,” writes blogger Jennifer Berg.

Travelers with a taste for the finer things in life would do well to explore Pittsburgh’s luxurious offerings, Berg says.

Read the full blog post here.
 

CMU professor receives national medal

Mary Shaw, the Alan J. Perliss University professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, was recently honored by President Obama. Shaw was one of eight recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for achievement in the field of technology, innovation and invention.

“These scholars and innovators have expanded our understanding of the world, made invaluable contributions to their fields, and helped improve countless lives,” President Obama said. “Our nation has been enriched by their achievements and by all the scientists and technologists across America dedicated to discovery, inquiry, and invention.”

Read more about Shaw’s honor here.

The Cathedral of Learning in LEGO bricks

LEGO lovers and Pitt alumni can show their support for making the Cathedral of Learning into a new LEGO set.

The 42-story Late Gothic Revival building is the cornerstone of the University of Pittsburgh’s Oakland campus. Blogger Josh Hall originally created the LEGO version of the cathedral for a competition at toy store S.W. Randall in Squirrel Hill.

“It’s such a clean geometric building, it just begs to be recreated in LEGO bricks,” Hall writes on his blog.

Show your support for production of the set here.
 

Yinzer accent makes late night

Actor Patrick Wilson, an alum of Carnegie Mellon University’s theater department, shared his best Pittsburgh impersonation with Seth Myers on NBC last week.

Myers, whose father holds a degree from CMU as well, talked Stillers, Gullifty’s and the Original Hot Dog shop with Wilson, who appeared on Late Night with Seth Myers to promote his movie Space Station 76.

“It’s an accent that exists just at the confluence of the three rivers,” Myers quipped.

Watch the stars swap their yinzer accents here.
 

'Does the prospect of running for office discourage women?'

Research conducted at the University of Pittsburgh on women’s willingness to run for political offices recently made the New York Times’ analytical website, the Upshot

Political Science professors Kristin Kanthak and Jonathan Woon discovered that women may have an aversion to the electoral process that is separate from external factors traditionally blamed for the gender gap in elections. 

The study grouped participants (both men and women) and required one person to do a math problem on behalf of each team. The problem doers were either randomly selected from the volunteers or elected by the group. The researchers found that both men and women volunteered when they would be selected at random, but not when they would face election. 

“The fact that representatives are chosen by electoral means is enough to dissuade women from putting themselves forward as candidates,” the study says.

"Suspended animation human trials to begin for wounded patients"

According to PBS, patients at UPMC Presbyterian Hospital will be the first to undergo trials for suspended animation as a treatment for knife and gunshot wounds. 

The process, referred to as emergency preservation and resuscitation, involves replacing patients’ blood with a cold saline solution to cause hypothermia. This reduces cellular activity and gives surgeons more time to repair wounds. 

Peter Rhee, a surgeon that contributed to developing the process, said that emergency preservation and resuscitation cannot bring a deceased patient back to life. 

“But if they’re dying and you suspend them, you have a chance to bring them back after their structural problems have been fixed,” he told New Scientist.

Read our story about this futuristic procedure here.

 

Weird rooms in Pittsburgh

Installation art has a way of getting to you. It takes a very familiar idea--a room--and turns it into something more."Putting elaborate theories aside, 'installation art' is the art of weird rooms. And, as a general rule, the more specific the room the more effectively weird and wonderful the installation. My two favorite things in the 2013 Carnegie International, which opened this weekend, were installations sited within the specific idiosyncrasies of the Carnegie Museum of Art."

To read more about the Carnegie International's collection of weird rooms and more weird rooms in Pittsburgh, click here.

Vogue praises the 56th Carnegie International

“A man’s first duty is to. . . .  make the world in some way better than you found it,” wrote the Scottish-American industrialist Andrew Carnegie in 1903. Today, no better example of the steel baron’s philanthropic vision is the Carnegie International, the oldest contemporary art survey in America, which opens this Saturday in Pittsburgh. Now in its 56th iteration, the exhibition takes place every three to five years, and was first conceived by Carnegie in 1896 to acquire “the old masters of tomorrow” for the then-nascent museum that bears his name."

Read the full article here.

The work behind child's play at the Carnegie

The New York Times reports on the "Playground Project," the Carnegie Museum's new exhibitional ode to the playground through history in a full-page spread this past Sunday. An excerpt:

"Mounted on plywood panels that suggest the walls of an impromptu recreation room, this jam-packed show uses photographs, film, books, architectural plans and models to illuminate the golden decades after World War II, when cities around the world felt the need to build new play areas in parks and on streets.

"Artists and architects buoyed by the work of child psychologists like Bruno Bettelheim and Jean Piaget reinvented the playground’s look and dreamed up new equipment. Once regarded as a holding area where children could be controlled and contained, by the 1960s the playground was seen as a zone for creative exploration and cognitive development."

To read more about the "Playground Project" and its message, click here.

Jonathan Borofsky's Walking to the Sky sculpture featured in photos

The Carnegie Mellon University sculpture by artist Jonathan Borofsky, with people walking straight up to the sky, is featured in various perspectives in this short but cool photo feature.

See it here.

Pittsburgh with kids: an education in fun

How much fun is Kidsburgh for kids?

Read the story here.

Pittsburgh holiday news in series of blogs

Want to keep up with holiday traditions and learn more about cool things to do over the holidays, as well as the history behind them? Look no further: read the blog series on Imagine Pittsburgh website.


Original fries among the best in the US says CNN

Original Hot Dog Shop. At this family-run stalwart, the mountain of fries that comes in even a small order borders on the ridiculous -- so no wonder the college kids keep coming back. Located on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh, "The Dirty O" has a reputation for decadent spuds: hand-cut and peeled Idaho potatoes, twice fried in peanut oil, and served golden and crunchy on a cafeteria tray. The Original even has its own dedicated fry station, where you can order them with sides of gravy, cheese, or ketchup. 3901 Forbes Ave.

Travel + Leisure: World's most delicious street foods

See the entire list here.
43 Oakland Articles | Page: | Show All
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