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Internet : Pittsburgh Innovates

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Duolingo lands $20 million. Named best ed app in the world by TechCrunch.

Language learning startup Duolingo remains on a winning streak with the announcement of millions in venture funding and another big award.
 
The Pittsburgh company landed its largest investment to date, $20 million, and received a 2013 “Crunchie” as the best education app in the world from TechCrunch. Founder and CEO, Luis von Ahn, generally a low kind of guy, expressed his elation.
 
“It’s pretty rare to see (Crunchie) winners that are not based in Silicon Valley,” says von Ahn. “We’re proud of the fact we won and we’re not that.”
 
TechCrunch touted Duolingo for its ability to teach real language skills through mobile tech in a “gamified” and fun way. The app currently is 20 million users strong and growing.
 
“There are more people learning a language on Duolingo than in the whole U.S. school system,” says von Ahn, who estimates that number at eight million.
 
The funding round was lead by Silicon Valley venture firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. Duolingo has previously raised $3.3 million lead by Union Square in 2011 and a $15 million round lead by NEA. Ashton Kutcher and author Tim Ferriss are also investors.
 
Big hiring will take place this year, von Ahn adds. Duolingo will add 16 to its staff of 34 people. It will also begin developing a language certification app that will allow users to take a standardized language test on their smartphone for only $20. Language certification standardized tests usually cost hundreds of dollar, he says.
 
Last December Duolingo was named iPhone App of the Year by Apple. The app owes its design and original concept to von Ahn and his CMU student, Severin Hacker.
 
Duolingo works by leading users through lessons and programs using fun games and exercises. As users translate web phrases, both by reading and listening to the language spoken by native speakers, they assist with the translation of web content, a concept known as crowdsourcing.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Luis von Ahn, Duolingo

Yahoo and CMU a potent force for the future of mobile technologies

Yahoo and CMU have joined forces in the development of a new generation of consumer applications for mobile technologies.
 
The collaboration between a tech company and university is the first of its kind in the country, says Justine Cassell, director of CMU’s Human Computer Institute.
 
CMU’s reputation as a powerhouse in the areas of computer science research and machine learning and Yahoo’s mobile technology databanks will generate not only new technologies but jobs for the region.
 
The five-year-partnership is estimated to be worth $10 million. It gives CMU researchers access to Yahoo’s experimental mobile software data in the creation of new products and technologies.
 
In return, Yahoo gains access to human resources at CMU, says Cassel. Yahoo plans on hiring scientists, researchers and practitioners in the area of machine learning and computer interaction as a result of the deal.
 
“They know CMU is stellar in these areas and by many metrics the best,” says Cassell. “This is a way for them to partner with faculty and students to see who is aligned with their interests.”
 
Dubbed Project InMind, the program includes the creation of a Yahoo-sponsored fellowship program at CMU that will provide financial and research support for computer science students and faculty.
 
Yahoo is focused on personalization, the primary focus of the collaboration. In the future, smartphones will predict where you will be driving later in the day and send you information on how to reserve a table at a nearby restaurants, says Cassell.
 
Or your mobile might remind you to re-subscribe for a piece of software on a set date and will increasingly do so without violating your privacy and giving specific access to your data, she adds.
 
The first two awardees are a computer scientist who is looking at how to better target and tailor news deliveries to meet people’s interest. A second researcher is developing usable privacy metrics.
 
CMU will have ownership over all intellectual property created by CMU but Yahoo will own anything developed with the company and will be able to license property owned by CMU.
 
Writer: Debra Smit
Source: Justine Cassel, CMU
 
 

Bearded in Lawrenceville makes .netMagazine list of top design studios in the world

Lawrenceville boutique studio Bearded has been named an international finalist by .net Magazine, a weighty honor in the world of web design.
 
Founded in 2008, Bearded started out in the home of founder Matt Griffin before he moved to a leaky room in Wilkinsburg and then on to better digs East Liberty. This month Bearded, now at six people, settled into a new space at 3445 Butler Street, a loft-style office in the former and historic public bathhouse building.
 
Bearded is a web design and development studio that specializes in good design and technical innovation. The studio creates responsive, content-managed websites and custom applications that work with everything from browsers to smartphones and large HDTVs, says Griffin.
 
“I was frustrated with the predominant model for designing things on the web,” he says. “Web design is a lot about controlling the chaos of the world. Taking the indigestible and making it clear.”
 
A Pittsburgh native and graduate of Allderdice High School, Griffiin has taught web design at Carnegie Mellon University and writes a regular column for A List Apart.
 
Clients include the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, Astorino Architects, 9/11 Tribute Center, Sprout Fund, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, Scarehouse and Zoobean.
 
.net Magazine received more than 2,000 nominations from which it selected 20 finalists for the honor of “Agency of the Year.” A public vote iin the coming weeks will narrow the list to five nominees; the final decision will be made by a panel of industry experts.
 
“A lot of the people on the list are our heroes of web design, people we look up to,” says Griffin. “Just to be nominated is fantastic.”
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Matt Griffin, Bearded

'Internet Famous,' a raunchy comedy with an all-Pittsburgh cast+crew

What happens when a young urban professional living in Pittsburgh goes viral and finds fame on the internet?
 
Internet Famous is a new web comedy series that premieres online tonight, Jan. 22, with a red carpet showing at the Hollywood Theatre in Dormont.
 
Creators Chris Lee (Pitt, MFA grad) and Tom Williams (Pittsburgh Filmmakers) met through friends and quickly found they had a mutual admiration for “good comedy." So they wrote a script and staged a successful Kickstarter campaign, which earned them about $7500, giving them enough to hire an all-Pittsburgh cast and crew.
 
The film was shot on location throughout the city during the recurring heatwaves in July and August of 2013. Lawrenceville, the East End and Shadyside served as backdrops for the story. 

“In a lot of ways, it’s the future of TV,” says Williams. “Netflicks and Hulu are producing original content. Digital production makes it all possible.”
 
The story follows a young urban professional named Andy and his friends—they hang out together at Remedy, by the way—as he discover the highs and lows of instant celebrity and internet fame.
 
“It’s Seinfeld comes to Pittsburgh, but a little more vulgar,” says Williams.
 
The music also draws from the local music scene: The Harlan Twins, Neighbours, Nic Lawless and His Young Criminals, Delicious Pastries and The Gotobeds, to name a few. Spruce Films in Lawrenceville pitched in on the production side.  
 
Trent Wolfred plays the lead role of Andy. A grad of Penn State University, he was last seen in Lucas McNelly’s Blanc de Blanc and is a cast member at Pittsburgh Public Theatre where he is the house manager. Matthew Robison, a graduate of Point Park University, plays Andy’s sex-crazed roommate. His previous work includes local short films and videos.

Seven short webisodes were shot, all of which will be shown tonight at The Hollywood. From here, the producers are hoping to find sponsors and local investors to begin season two. Check out the trailer and premiere.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Tom Williams, Internet Famous
 
 
 

Innovation that Mayor Bill Peduto wants that Pittsburgh needs

While the weather outside was frightful, the inauguration of Pittsburgh’s 60th mayor on Monday couldn’t have been warmer. 
  
From rocker Joe Grushecky intoning “…won’t you be my neighbor” with backup from the CAPA chorus, to poet Vanessa German inciting us to rise up and become change agents on our own front porches, to gospel singers and homemade pierogies, the Pittsburgh promise generated a heat all its own. 
 
“There is nothing wrong with the institutions of this city that cannot be repaired by good faith, square dealing and hard work,” Peduto told the gathered crowd at Heinz Hall.
 
“I will not make the mistake of assuming that my ascension to the office of mayor is, in itself, political reform. It is my job to turn this moment into an opportunity for reform.”
 
A self-described data-driven guy, Mayor Peduto moves into the office armed with 1100 pages of notes generated by a citizen-lead advisory committee that worked through the holidays on ideas to lead the region forward.
 
He has an ambitious to-do list of his own, as well, no less than 100 highly-detailed ways to lead the region, often tapping technology to get the job done.
 
Here’s a sampling of a few of the items on his innovation checklist, things Mayor Peduto wants that Pittsburgh needs:
 
· User-friendly government, beginning with a new cabinet position. Among the first hires will be a chief performance and innovation officer, a job expected to go to Debra Lam. Bring on big data!
 
· City streets with smarter traffic signals. Streamlined digital building permit systems and equal opportunity technology for all.
 
· A green tech and clean tech investment fund.
 
· Quality education and growing STEM opportunities for students.
 
· Showcasing neighborhoods through pedestrian way-finding. It will be interesting to see what this looks like.
 
· And GPS tracking for snow plows.
 
Let the new year and new season for the region begin.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Photos copyright by Brian Cohen.

Glen Meakem believes in the promise of Forever, his followup to Freemarkets

With Glen Meakem's days with Becker Meakem Venture Capital winding down, what’s next for the founder of the wildly successful online auctioneer, Freemarkets?
 
His new endeavor is Forever, a cloud-based, personal social storage site that preserves cherished media memories— vintage photographs, audio, video and digital media—in one standard format, putting it all in a safe and secure cloud. 
 
It’s going to be bigger than FreeMarkets, he predicts.
 
“I don’t want to be in a little dingy on the horizon,” he says, figuring the industry has a $2 billion market potential based on the sheer number of people in the world with family stories to preserve. “I want be leading the Normandy invasion.”  
 
Meakem, the historian in his own family, began thinking about the archiving business back in 1991, the summer he returned home from the Gulf War. Setting out on a road trip to visit relatives, he recorded video footage of his three living grandparents along the way, capturing family stories that might be otherwise lost. 
 
When he was done, he gave a copy to family members. “If you asked them today where it is, not one would know,” he says. “They all lost it.”
 
So where is a family to keep important personal records in the digital age—medical records, wills, documents as well as their personal scrapbooks? Facebook owns everything you upload on its site, he says. DropBox requires a monthly bill and shuts down accounts that fall delinquent.
 
Meakem did the research and found there was no permanent place to both save and share a family legacy privately, for all of eternity, assuming that clouds live forever. Any system also needed the technology to migrate different media formats—like VHS tapes or Super 8—to one standard format. 
 
For a one-time buy in, currently $295, customers join Forever’s permanent endowment, a restricted fund managed as an endowed fund. The one-time payment secures your content for as long as you live, plus one hundred years, he says.
 
“We will never lose anybody’s stuff,” he adds. “Everything is triple backed up in different sites around the world and encrypted. And you own it.”
 
The company, based in Market Square downtown, employs 40 full-time. Since it was officially founded in May of 2012, the firm has raised $13 million. David Ciesinski, a former Heinz executive, has joined as executive vice president.  
 
“My passion and love is setting a vision, inspiring people, leading and selling,” says Meakem of his latest venture. “I just didn’t enjoy being a VC very much. After six or seven years, I realized that I missed being a CEO.”
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Glen Meakem, Forever

Pittsburgh schools take students on wild rides through science, teach video game design

Students today are hungry for a challenging learning environment that not only engages them, but also prepares them for the 21st century workplace. So what does this look like?

Two high schools in the Pittsburgh region are embracing innovative educational models that teach STEAM skills in creative ways. One is a classroom that looks more like a place you might find at Epcot in Disney World; the other is an academy for future video game designers.

At Shaler High School, students are stepping into an immersive, virtual world called Dream Flight Adventures where they embark on their own missions that take them into the scientific realms of outer space, human body or deep sea.

Before the day of the mission, teachers prep the students. When the day arrives, the excited class takes its spot in a room that is designed as a command center, and moderated by an administrator who serves as flight director. The students manipulate the mission on iPads and follow the journey on a wide screen at the front of the room.

“When kids walk in, many think it will be like a video game, with scripted outcomes, says Gary Gardiner, CEO and creator.  “They quickly realize this is more of a real life experience. There is a lot of screaming and yelling.”

“Once the kids come in here, they are no longer are fifth graders, they are engineers, and hackers and physicists,” adds Michael Penn, GATE teacher and flight director. “They own these jobs. Time stops for them; they are so reluctant to leave.”
Dream Flight Adventure hopes to expand to other area school districts, says Gardiner, who is also manager of education and entertainment initiatives at Idea Foundry.

At Elizabeth Forward High School, Zulama’s Gaming Academy offers students a high school level curriculum based on course work offered at CMU’s Entertainment Technology Center (ETC). The academy teaches STEAM skills through classes on game design, 3D modeling and modern storytelling.
 
In its second year, the program has grown from 30 to 190 students.
 
“It’s changing the way teachers are teaching,” says Nikki Navta, founder and CEO. “It gives students practice for jobs that exist in the real world.”
 
Zulama addresses soft learning skills including working in teams, learning to communicating and collaborating effectively. It’s not about just math, science, art and history, says Navta. It gives students a tangible portfolio of work.
 
“The collaboration and the creation that students get to do is far more intrinsically motivating than any other course that I’ve seen offered in my mere 10 years of education,” says Heather Hibner, a teacher at Elizabeth Forward.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Zulama and Dream Flight Adventures
 
 
 
 

PAEYC's Unconference invites education innovators and app developers to a playgroup

Staying ahead of the early education learning curve is a challenge In a world where young children grow up knowing how operate cell phones before they can talk.
 
PAEYC (Pittsburgh Association for the Education of Young Children) is addressing this with a unique two-day event, “UnConference 2013: Game On!” on Nov. 15 and 16, a play group for educators and technologists who will work together to create cool, cutting-edge learning tools. The hack-a-thon will be held at Google Pittsburgh while the UnConference will be held at CMU in Rashid Auditorium.

The event is open to early childhood professionals, K-4 teachers, art and music teachers, basically anyone looking for a creative jumpstart to meeting young students where they are today.
 
PAEYC has tapped 21 app developers who will be turning ideas from teachers into really great educational mobile apps. More than 200 yearly childhood educators will participate in the event and field trips.
 
“Our goal is to create a diverse community of learners and early childhood educators, technologists and innovators who share a common desire for quality early childhood experiences,” says Cara Ciminillo operations director of PAEYC. 
 
“We want early childhood educators to see themselves as a really important part in the maker movement; they are the first ones to create an environment for children to imagine, explore, and innovate,” she adds.

The unconference includes field trips to several highly innovative learning spaces: MakeShop, CMU’s Entertainment Technology Center, MAYA Design, Google Pittsburgh and Tech Shop. Illah Nourbakhsh, director of Create Lab at CMU, is a keynote speaker and Bill Isler of Fred Rogers Company will participate.
 
The event is supported in part by the Spark Fund for Early Learning at The Sprout Fund. Registration is required.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Cara Ciminillo, PAEYC

Duolingo launches "The Incubator" to create lessons for every language in the world

Duolingo is launching a massive initiative this week that will begin building interactive language lessons for every language in the world, including some rather unusual tongues.
 
Called The Incubator, the new offering will not only expand the number of languages currently being taught by the Pittsburgh-based startup, but will preserve other languages for posterity, says Luis von Ahn, CEO and founder.
 
“We’ve received interest from thousands of people wanting to help (with the new platform),” says von Ahn.  “In essence, we will be crowdsourcing language education.”
 
Launched in beta in November of 2011, Duolingo is a free language-learning website and app that has attracted 10 million users to date. The site teaches foreign language skills through online gaming exercises that allow users to practice writing and dictation.
 
Duolingo users are demanding more than 50 languages that are not currently offered, says von Ahn. The best way to stay abreast of demand is through The Incubator, which will grow the language website organically.
 
The crowd sourced approach is far more expedient than if Duolingo were to hire employees to do the job. The creation of one language alone would take one person four to five months, he says.
 
“Once we deem it (a language developed through The Incubator) good enough we will launch it in beta and watch how well people are learning,” von Ahn says. “We will let the community drive it.  In many cases, we think the community can do a better job than us.”
 
Duolingo currently offers courses in Spanish, English, French, Portuguese, Brazilian and Italian. The languages most in demand include Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Arabic and Swedish.
 
Users are also asking for unconventional offerings like Esperanto, a politically neutral language created to foster world peace, and Elfish, a tongue derived from the world of J.R. Tolkien, he says.
 
“It’s a little nerve-wracking because in a sense we are giving control away,” he says. “But we will be watching everything. With the incubator, it will be up to the people, not just us.”
 
Most of the users to date are from the U.S. (25 percent) and Brazil (15 percent). Duolingo has yet to tap the Asian market. Through The Incubator, Duolingo expects to add 15 to 20 languages within the first three to six months and another 50 beyond that.
 
The company is expanding and will move into its larger office space on Walnut Street on Oct. 28th.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Luis von Ahn, Duolingo

Pittsburgh college entrepreneur wins national competition for Sequoia Waste Solutions

Charlie Dolan, a 21-year-old college senior and co-founder of Pittsburgh-based Sequoia Waste Solutions, took first place in the Global Student Entrepreneur Awards’ regional competition.
 
Dolan will go on to compete for the global title in Washington, D.C., this November.
 
Dolan and several friends, all graduates of Central Catholic High School, started the waste solution company in 2012. The company creates client-specific waste solutions that matches building materials with a network of partners and service providers. In the end, customers save both money and the environment.
 
Dolan entered the competition as a senior at Villanova University, where he runs the company while attending school.
 
“They (judges) were really impressed with the idea and the method,” says Dolan, company CTO. “Just to be in the running with amazing young entrepreneurs from around the world is an honor.”
 
Sequoia’s customers are primarily restaurants, educational facilities and corporate offices. Not only does each company typically save between 5-15 percent annually on their trash and recycling costs, but less trash ends up in landfills, he says.
 
The company is expected to surpass $5 million in revenue this year.  “Our goal is to be the data hub of trash in Pittsburgh,” he says. “And to create local jobs.”
 
The GSEA competition recognizes student entrepreneurs from around the world who are successfully running a profitable business while attending school. It is organized by the Entrepreneur’s Organization, a global business network of more than 9,500 business owners in 40 countries.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Charlie Dolan, Sequoia Waste Solutions

UX Pittsburgh hosts discussion on the future of "big data" driven design at Revv Oakland

The future of data-driven design and how big data fits into the picture is the focus of an event at Revv Oakland Oct. 1.
 
UX Pittsburgh, a forum of Pittsburgh user experience professionals, will host “Data-Driven Design” to address just how big data can be leveraged in this area, from aggregation to information visualization and predictive modeling.
 
Adi Veerubhotla, a user experience designer for IBM, and Pat Stroh, vice president of Data Science and Consulting Services at Precision Dialogue, will speak and lead the discussion.
 
“Big Data has been around for quite some time, but professionals need to figure out a way to look at, analyze and understand what all that information is really saying and how to make it digestible to users,” says Erica Volkman, founder of UX Pittsburgh.
 
The event will be held at Revv Oakland, located at 122 Meyran Avenue in Oakland. To reserve a spot, click here. It is co-sponsored by Gatesman+Dave.
 
Writer: Deb Smit

Looking for last-minute Steelers or concert tickets? Get The HookUp gets you there

Pittsburgh entrepreneur Levi Benson has the perfect Pittsburgh app for living in the moment.
 
Looking for a lucky last minute ticket to a Steelers game? Decide at the 11th hour that you can go to that big rock concert? Get The HookUp is a mobile app that allows users to seal the deal in the final hours before the venue starts. 
 
“I find it fascinating that people try to sell tickets by waving them in the air,” says Levi Benson, a native of Butler and graduate of Pitt. “There’s a marketplace for people who want to buy and sell tickets at the last minute.” 
 
Say a storm is rolling in and you don’t feel like spending money to sit in the rain. Or you’re not feeling well. Selling a good seat for a fair price at the last minute is a tricky undertaking, especially after the window closes on a sale through StubHub or Craigslist (four to six hours before a venue starts). 
 
Get The HookUp is free and works through GPS technology, allowing people to buy and sell tickets at their convenience from any location. When a buyer or seller creates a listing, a pin drops on a map giving users immediate access to tickets that are available or needed. Transactions are agreed upon by the parties through direct chats. 
 
No more standing on street corners hoping to get lucky. “Scalpers won’t like it," Benson admits. “It offers more transparency. Buyers and sellers can see the (pricing) spread." 
 
The app was created with the help of Pittsburgh-based C-Leveled in East Liberty. Once it achieves the critical mass it needs to be successful, Benson plans to add additional features. Friends can also use it to find one another, he adds.
 
If one thing's a given in life, it's that there will always be last-minute tickets, says Benson.  
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Levi Benson, Get The HookUp

Luke Skurman takes College Prowler to the next level with Niche, K-12 school rankings

Helping students pick the right colleges for themselves has been College Prowler’s sweet spot for 11 years running. So where does the successful Shadyside startup, one of the largest college content websites in the country, go from here?
 
Founder and CEO Luke Skurman has launched a new company and brand called Niche, a site that provides the same trusted in-depth reviews and analyses that has made College Prowler successful, but with expansive content for public and private schools across the U.S., kindergarten to 12th grade.
 
“It was time to think about a bigger vision and brand,” says Skurman, always the forward-thinking entrepreneur. “We’re very pleased with how far we’ve come. We want people to continue making great life decisions.”
 
Niche has amassed 400,000 user-generated reviews and has graded 80,000 public and private K-12 schools since its launch four months ago. More districts will be added with 120,000 public and private schools as the ultimate goal.
 
Families on the move--or merely interested in how their school district stacks up--will find information on popular high school classes, racial diversity, where students go to college, graduation rates and student-written reviews.
 
Many of the same students and parents who had generated reviews for College Prowler participated in the school district surveys, says Skurman. In addition to user-generated reviews, Niche draws on government databases and school administration surveys. 
 
The K-12 school letter rankings—A, B, C, and D—are calculated by comparing a school’s assessment scores on state assessment tests with other schools in their state. 
 
The point is not to become an advocacy group, but to report impartial data, Skurman says. “We want to keep tackling big life decisions…providing as much transparency, insight and clarity on the educational system as possible.”
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Luke Skurman, Niche

Resolution Hope and TrueFit create a serious app to rescue victims of child sex trafficking

Many people don’t realize that child sex trafficking is a massive industry in the United States and one of the fastest growing crimes in the world, says Brian Shivler.

They think it’s an overseas problem, he adds. Yet the U.S. is among the top three sex trafficking destinations in the world. The Super Bowl has become the single largest human trafficking episode in this country.
 
The Wexford resident and father of two girls hopes to change this through an organization he founded called Resolution Hope. The nonprofit began by raising money through two concerts at Stage AE.  

Resolution Hope also teamed with Pittsburgh-based innovation company TrueFit and recently launched an app that is designed to motivate people to become more vigilant in the reporting of suspicious and potential trafficking activity. 

The idea is to empower people to report what they see on the streets, says Shivler. 
 
“When you’re dealing with these criminals, time is of the essence. It’s designed to not just educate but empower citizens right away,” says Christopher Evans of TrueFit. “These are experts in moving children.”

The app is called 13A, which is the national campaign to end sex trafficking in America. A 99-cent download includes a powerful video, a checklist of what to look for and a “make a report” button, which sends reports directly to Polaris, the national sex trafficking hotline, and the Dept. of Homeland Security Human Trafficking Tip Line.

The app also allows users to take and store videos and pictures.

“This is one way we knew we could empower people and help the law enforcement community,” Evans adds. “One of their biggest challenges is getting real time info in the field. These are people who have dedicated their lives to this.”
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Brian Shivler, Resolution Hope; Christopher Evans, TrueFit

Can I afford this? BudgetSimple teaches us to strategically chip away debt

With so many online tools to make budgeting household expenses easier, can it get any simpler?
 
BudgetSimple thinks so. The AlphaLab startup, which started as an Excel spreadsheet for friends, proved so popular—growing from 60,000 to 114,000 users in no time—co-founder Phil Anderson decided to try turning it into a business. He joined the South Side startup incubator and began tweaking the platform and developing a mobile app.
 
While there are many financial products on the market, most are complicated and cluttered, he says. The key to BudgetSimple is the simple act of logging transactions and acknowledging expenses and spending patterns; it works much the same way a weight loss app identifies the small ways we cheat ourselves every day. 
 
“Just the act of thinking about it is helpful,” he says. “You’re forced to think about everything.”
 
While the tool is free, an upgrade ($29 to $39 a year) provides a mobile app and reminders and scheduling tools. A new version will be rolled out in several months, allowing users to automatically track and categorize all transaction through a read-only, third party provider. The reporting feature, which creates a pie graph of your monthly spending, is cool and free. 
 
“It's the simplicity that seems to be the thing that gets people to stick with us,” says Anderson. “While other programs are telling you where your money went after it's too late, we're trying to give people actionable advice based on financial planning best practices.”  
 
Anderson, originally from Baltimore, is joined by co-founder Dimitry Bentsionov of Pittsburgh. Anderson formerly worked for Vivisimo, Lunametrics and the Pittsburgh startup Levlr.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Phil Anderson, BudgetSimple
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