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The Global Switchboard will offer coworking space for international-minded organizations

There’s a new Lawrenceville co-working space opening in May that will bring fresh resources to the city and cultivate new global ideas and connections. Known as The Global Switchboard Project, this shared-space, community-oriented work-center will be Pittsburgh’s home for organizations committed to global engagement.

Nathan Darity, project manager of The Global Switchboard, says it will bring together dozens of organizations in Pittsburgh already working on global and local connections and enhance their work through collaboration. 
 
“Pittsburgh is a global city,” says Brandon Blache-Cohen, executive director of Amizade Global Service-Learning, the organization leading the project. “It was built and continues to grow from an ever-changing group of immigrants, and the contributions of their children. We believe The Global Switchboard will both export the best practices of community development that we have pioneered here, and begin to import new ideas from our friends around the world.”
 
Amizade’s mission is to empower individuals and communities through worldwide service and learning. Blache-Cohen says he expects The Global Switchboard to significantly improve the way Amizade connects its community partners abroad with Pittsburgh and transform the way Pittsburghers engage with the rest of the world.
 
The Global Switchboard is the in midst of a crowdfunding campaign to raise $10,000 to complete its office space at 3406 Ligonier Street. The facility near Doughboy Square will serve as headquarters for both Amizade and anchor organization Global Solutions Pittsburgh, a nonprofit providing non-partisan, internationally focused education to schools and communities throughout western Pennsylvania.  

 “The Global Switchboard is an opportunity for Pittsburgh to reinvest in itself and rededicate itself to building an inclusive and engaged community, says Daniel Giovannelli, executive director of Global Solutions Pittsburgh. “Phrases like 'international relations' sound like they are only for PhDs, JDs, and MBAs, but in the 21st century Pittsburgh interacts with the world and the world interacts with Pittsburgh. The Global Switchboard is both a physical and symbolic representation of that shift… into the larger community.”
 
In addition to Global Solutions Pittsburgh, the Global Switchboard already has six member organizations: Global Pittsburgh, Rukmini Foundation, Classrooms Without Borders, ChildLight, Pittsburgh Hispanic Development Corporation, and Cameroon Football Development Program.
 
Other organizations and individuals with a commitment to socially responsible international development, global education in Pittsburgh and abroad, and/or community empowerment can apply to be a paying member of The Global Switchboard at www.theglobalswitchboard.org.
 
Writer: Amanda Leff Ritchie
Sources: Brandon Blache-Cohen, Daniel Giovannelli

Who's Hiring in Pittsburgh? Bricolage Productions, Pittsburgh Regional Health Initiative and more

The Pittsburgh Regional Health Initiative/Jewish Healthcare Foundation is looking for a Product Manager for Tomorrow’s HealthCare, the organization’s online knowledge network for healthcare quality improvement. Resumes and cover letters should be sent to Chief Analytics Officer Ken Moore.

Downtown’s Bricolage Productions is searching for a new general manager to handle the theater’s day-to-day administration and organization.Training and/or experience in arts administration are preferred.The deadline for applications is 6PM on March 14.

Elias/Savion Advertising agency is looking for a copywriter with 3-5 years’ experience.

Carnegie Mellon has a vacancy for an Assistant Director of Annual Giving Strategies. The ideal candidate will be responsible for the day-to-day operations of the university’s direct mail and e-mail programs, developing and implementing communications and solicitation plans and managing all fundraising efforts related to the school’s Greek life.

Pittsburgh communications and design firm Mizrahi is looking for a senior designer with at least five years’ experience to join its creative team.

Heinz Field is looking for a Tours Assistant to help with the scheduling and booking of tours of the facility. It is a part-time opening.

Edison Learning is seeking an advisor to guide its students through their electronic learning curricula. A minimum of five years’ teaching experience in a brick-and-mortar school is necessary.

Want to post a job on "Who's Hiring in Pittsburgh?" Contact us at innovationnews@popcitymedia.com.

Writer: Matthew Wein

Local biomedical researchers win top prize from the National Academy of Sciences

About five and a half years ago, when virologist Carolyn Coyne, an associate professor at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, was expecting her son, among the many questions she had about pregnancy was how viruses would treat her body and the body of her baby. Her curiosity has led to an award-winning paper about how the placenta has evolved to protect a fetus from viral infection.

Human placental trophoblasts confer viral resistance to recipient cells was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in July of last year, and in April, Coyne, along with her co-author, Dr. Yoel Sadovsky, an obstetrician/gynecologist and director of the Magee-Womens Research Insitute, will travel to Washington, D.C. to receive the Cozzarelli Prize for top biomedical sciences paper published in the journal in 2013.

The Cozzarelli prize was established in 2005 and is rewarded to papers that reflect originality and scientific excellence.
Coyne and Sadovsky’s paper showed that the placenta can prevent viruses from passing from a pregnant woman to her fetus and that this resistance can be transferred to other, non-placenta cells.

“In a general sense, we’ve identified at least one of the mechanisms that we think the human placenta has evolved to limit viral infections,” Coyne says.

The mechanism is a micro RNA that can be found in the circulation of pregnant woman. Harnessing the power of that small RNA could, in theory, help develop therapies for viruses contracted both during and outside of pregnancy. 

Sadovsky says that despite extensive study of the placenta, which is the interface between a mother and fetus, there have been very little data to illuminate the significance of viruses during pregnancy.

“This became a very intriguing collaboration to use the power of virology, obstetrics and gynecology,” says Sadovsky.

The pair are honored to have won the Cozzarelli Prize for their hard work.

Says Coyne: “We are very proud of our research paper and are gratified that the scientific community deems our work noteworthy.”

Author: Erin Keane Scott
Sources: Anita Srikameswaran, Dr. Yoel Sadovsky and Carolyn Coyne, Ph.D

Who's Hiring in Pittsburgh: IBM, Deeplocal, Public Source and more

IBM’s Pittsburgh division has more than a dozen openings for various positions, including several on its Watson division.

Deeplocal, one of Pittsburgh’s top innovation firms, has five full-time openings for web developers and software engineers, as well as four available internships.

Public Source, an independent news agency that covers the critical issues facing the Pittsburgh region and Pennsylvania, is looking for a new Director of Marketing.

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh has part-time openings for library assistants, clerks and pages at its Homewood, Allegheny, West End and Knoxville branches.

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra is in search of both an artistic coordinator and a manager of events.

The University of Pittsburgh’s Athletics Department is seeking an assistant director of player personnel to assist with on-campus recruiting efforts. Ideal candidates will have at least two years’ experience in football operations.

Continuum Managed Services, a provider of resolution-oriented management software and data protection for managed service providers, is hiring service desk technicians. The ideal candidates should have either a degree in information technology from a college or technical school or at least four years of experience in service desk environments.

East End Cooperative Ministries is seeking a new executive director.

If you’re looking for a little adventure, Giant Eagle is seeking part-time detectives to identify and apprehend shoplifters.

Is your business hiring? E-mail us.

Writer: Matthew Wein

A sense of play: Two Pittsburgh toy startups draw attention at national convention

It’s not easy to make a splash amid the more than 1,000 exhibitors at the American International Toy Fair, the giant trade show that ran earlier this month in New York City.
 
But two Pittsburgh startups, both launching highly innovative products marrying technology with play -- and both with connections to Carnegie Mellon and the AlphaLab accelerator -- drew a lot of buzz.

"This is definitely a David and Goliath story of startups grabbing attention from Hasbro, Disney, Leap Frog, etc.," says Terri Glueck of Pittsburgh's Innovation Works
 
PieceMaker Technologies is developing self-service, 3-D printing kiosks for toy stores. The "factory in a store" allows customers to personalize about 100 designs for toys, jewelry and other small gifts. Once they’ve designed their item, an employee produces it at the 3-D printing station in about 20 minutes. Suggested retail will range from $5 to $10.
 
Founded in 2013 by Carnegie Mellon engineering graduate students Arden Rosenblatt and Alejandro Sklar, Piecemaker is getting ready to test the concept at two Pittsburgh locations of S.W. Randall Toyes & Giftes this spring and plans an expanded, 10-store pilot for the holiday season.
 
The prototype on display at the toy fair drew press, including stories on CNBC and in Make magazine, "tons of signups" and interest from Disney for Disneyland locations, reports Rosenfeld.
 
Rosenfeld and Sklar build the kiosks in their quarters at AlphaLab Gear; they are among the first cohort of companies at the hardware and robotics accelerator.
 
Meanwhile, Digital Dream Labs has developed a system that allows children to control videogames by rearranging puzzle pieces. They are ramping up to start production this summer.
 
As grad students at Carnegie Mellon's Entertainment Technology Center, Peter Kinney, Justin Sabo and Matt Stewart collaborated on an interactive exhibit for the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. The dreamTableTop is still in use in Pittsburgh, and the company has since produced three more for other children’s museums.
 
When they launched their company in 2012 and pitched to AlphaLab, the advice they received was that they needed to broaden their market. Drawing on the museum exhibit, Digital Dream Labs created its Ludos system -- a plastic tray that connects to a computer or device, 22 toy blocks and game software.
 
When Ludos starts shipping in late summer, it will be bundled with "Cork the Volcano," a game aimed at children six-and-older that teaches logic and sequencing. Other games for kids as young as four are in development.
 
Stewart says the company has a healthy number of pre-orders and several promising large contracts thanks to the toy show. The company currently employs four people (the three co-founders and artist Aaron Clark, a recent graduate of the Art Institute of Pittsburgh) and Stewart says the goal is to quadruple in-house staff by the end of 2015. Digital Dream Labs has outgrown its digs at AlphaLab and is looking for expanded space in Pittsburgh.

This piece originally appeared in our sister publication, Keystone Edge on Feb. 27.

Who's hiring in Pittsburgh? Pop City, Siemens and WTAE-TV

Each week Pop City reports on the latest in company hiring news.

Pop City is looking for a new editor to cover the arts and culture beat for the publication’s Pop Filter section. The new editor should have his or her finger on the pulse of the local arts community and a keen awareness of the role that art and culture play in the continuing revitalization of Pittsburgh. This is a part-time position ideal for freelancers. For more information contact erin@popcitymedia.com
 
Siemens Building Technologies in Bridgeville is hiring a senior sales executive. The ideal candidate will manage and grow a territory or group of accounts. The position requires a Bachelors degree in engineering, business or a similar field with four to six years of related work experience, or an equivalent combination of education and work experience. 
 
WTAE-TV is hiring a news photographer and editor with two years of experience.
 
Askesis Development Group of UPMC is hiring a full-time marketing project manager to help support the Askesis Pennsylvania Department for its downtown Pittsburgh location. Askesis Development Group, a subsidiary of UPMC Insurance Services, is a software development firm that addresses the specialized needs of the behavioral health industry.
 
The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review seeks an experienced investigative reporter to join its staff who is comfortable addressing topics on a regional, state, national and international level.  Candidates should have at least seven years of strong reporting experience.
 
VisitPITTSBURGH is recruiting for On-Call employees in their Convention Services Department.  Positions needed include Registrars, PittsburghHosts, Cashiers, and Information Table Clerks and the pay rate is $10-11.75 an hour depending. Email resumes to hr@visitpittsburgh.com

Have hiring news? Email erin@popcitymedia.com and send the career links.

Astrobotic a frontrunner in the Olympic-like race to the moon for the Google Lunar XPRIZE

Pittsburgh-based Astrobotic remains firmly among the frontrunners in the Google Lunar XPRIZE competition, a race to the moon that is beginning to resemble an Olympic-style event.
 
The deadline to complete the lunar mission is October 2015. The first to the finish line wins a $30 million purse.
 
The Strip District robotics firm, a CMU spinout, has been a serious contender since the competition was announced in 2007. The XPRIZE pits university scientists from around the world against one another in a mission that involves creating the hardware and software to land on the moon, explore the lunar surface and relay high-definition footage back to Earth.
 
The idea behind the contest is to inspire engineers and entrepreneurs from around the world to develop low-cost methods of space exploration. But the sheer cost of the race itself has proved a hurdle for many.
 
“Most people are putting us on top of the rankings,” says John Thornton, CEO, who stopped short of predicting an outright win.
 
Thornton has been instrumental in growing the business side of Astrobotic, especially its payload to the moon business as a way to raise the money to win the money and, of course, the prestige that goes with it.
 
This month Astrobotic picked up $1.75 million as one of five finalists in the Google Lunar XPRIZE Milestone Prize, an award created to recognize the teams that have completed several of the objectives so far, technology for landing, mobility and imaging the mission.
 
Of the five teams selected, Astrobotic and Moon Express (Silicon Valley) were the only two to earn the cash award in all three categories. The other three milestone winners were Hakuto (Japan), Part-Time Scientists (Germany) and Team Indus (India).
 
Earlier this month, Astrobotic cut a deal with Astroscale in Singapore to transport the popular Asian sports drink, Pocari Sweat, to the lunar surface. It will be the first commercial beverage to touch down on the moon, says Thornton.
 
“For us, this is just like any other payload that we will fly to the moon,” he says. “That’s our business strategy, to carry payloads.”
 
Astrobotic plans to launch a robotic lander and rover aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from the Kennedy Space Center in October 2015, exact date to be determined, for a four-day flight to the moon.
 
While the mission will be monitored from the space center, scientists from CMU will control the rover.
 
Astrobotic employs 12 and operates out of a warehouse in the Strip District, next to the Opera House, and plans to add another 5,200 square feet for a total of 8,000 square feet.
 
“We’ve come a long way,” says Thornton.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: John Thornton, Astrobotic

Meet the new Thrill Mill companies

Big data tools that identify the college courses you need to land your first job. A better dual-laptop. An online music site that wants to be the Craigslist of music.
 
These are among the 13 new startups that moved in to Thrill Mill’s accelerator space this month, full of promise and big entrepreneurial ideas.

Thrill Mill CEO Bobby Zappala couldn’t be more excited about the new group.
 
“The idea is for this to be a growing community, not one that turns over,” says Zappala. “Eventually we want to create an alumni hall so anyone can pop your head in anytime. It keeps the energy going in the space.”
Meet the teams:
 
Because is a third party commenting system for online media sites that encourages civil and on-topic conversations. Two Pittsburgh brothers, Nick and TJ Santillo, are behind the idea.
 
BricoMama wants to be the place where property owners and contractors find labor that meets the parameters of any job. The platform is geared toward both the contractor and consumers, allowing both to input what each are looking for and locate the best person for the job.
 
Campusbuck.com is a web and mobile-based promotional marketing solution for small business owners in college towns, like ours, in helping them to connect with and offer vouchers to the student community. Two MBA grads from IUP are behind the startup, which has already begun to generate revenue.
 
CCChampions is a nonprofit that gives children with cancer an opportunity to meet and develop friendships with professional athletes. The platform, developed by Sidney Kushar, was launched nationally in Pittsburgh in 2013 through the Steelers and the Pirates. So far it has served more than 300 kids.
 
Fittsburgh wants to make Pittsburgh a healthy place to live. Brothers Joe and Anthony Vennare have created a sustainable model that allows people to take care of themselves, from box lunches to corporations.
 
Kreide, founded by Stephanie Kunkel and Katie Imler, provides NCAA member institutions with educational compliance materials. The idea is to navigate the complexities of the system to help athletic staff and athletes in navigating the rules and preventing infractions.
 
LUV Water is creating a self-sustainable, sophisticated water purification device that uses UV LEDs to clean the water.
 
Smart tools from MedZen want to make the electronic compliance system for primary care physicians more user-friendly. The idea is to reduce the burden of documentation while ensuring compliance, reducing overhead, improving efficiency and enhancing the quality of doctor-patient interaction.
 
MeshNet is designing a big data platform that will optimize the interaction between students, educators, and employers and help people (especially students) use software to navigate and make better life decisions such as what courses to take to land a job.
 
Conceived by a group of Pitt grads, it won the Pitt Big Idea Competition and was the grand-prize winner in the most recent Business Bout.
 
MIX is developing a specialty salad restaurant concept for the East Liberty area. The idea is to create a creative dining experience focused on providing access to fast and health-conscious meal options.
 
PittsburghBeats.com wants to be the craigslist of music. Developed by Solomon Ilochi, a Duquesne freshman, it’s an online music distribution company that specializes in the promotion of local talent. Users may sign up, upload, share, and eventually sell their works. Users will also be able to create custom merchandise and sell tickets to their shows.
 
Portal offers premier hardware solutions through the creation of a dual laptop, an attachable mobile workstation that provides additional USB ports, extending battery life and adds an equally sized secondary screen that can be conveniently hidden while not in use.
 
TameraOnline, being developed by Tamera Szijarto, a native of the Philippines who is attending Katz Business School, is looking to build a scalable model to bring cosmetic products to the international marketplace.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Bobby Zappala, Thrill Mill

The Heinz Awards recognizes five great Americans pushing the country forward

 The Heinz Awards were announced this week recognizing five recipients from across the country whose pioneering work is an inspiration to the world.
 
This year’s winners are rock stars of innovation in their perspective fields. A doctor who has revolutionized community health care using video conferencing technology; a social media entrepreneur who is using social media to empower people to lift themselves out of poverty; an environmental scientist who is seeking sustainable solutions to the world’s food supply.
 
“This year’s Heinz Award recipients show that the antidote for the uncertainty and fears of our times lies where it always has—the imagination, determination, brilliance and creativity of the people among us who see possibilities where others see only barriers,” says Teresa Heinz, chairman of the Heinz Family Foundation.
 
The theme of technological innovation is woven throughout the work of this year’s winners and overlaps with the strong presence of similar work being conducted in our region, says Kim O’Dell, program director of The Heinz Awards.
 
For example, Dr. Sanjeev Arora, winner in the Public Policy category, has taken widely available video conferencing technology and created a platform that is serving patients in medically underserved areas of New Mexico.
 
Leila Janah of San Francisco, Calif., winner in the Technology, the Economy and Employment category, is the founder of the nonprofit Samasource, which uses the global reach of the Internet to train people in the poorest regions in the world.
 
Janah has extended the concept with a similar program, SamaUSA, aimed at low-income digital workers at community colleges in the U.S. She is also one of the youngest people recognized in the history of The Heinz Awards.
 
The other winners include:
 
Dr. Abraham Verghese of Stanford, Calif., a passionate physician whose critically acclaimed writing documents the belief that healing must go beyond mere science and addresses the art of compassionately healing patients.
 
Dr. Jonathan Foley of St. Paul, Minn., and his wide-ranging research on global environmental systems that addresses agriculture with a plan to double the world’s food production by focusing on improving agricultural efficiency, reducing waste and shifting diets.
 
Salman Kahn of Mountain View, Calif., for his acclaimed Kahn Academy, a nonprofit educational organization that is revolutionizing how millions of students around the globe are learning a wide range of subjects.

The Heinz Awards was established by Teresa Heinz to honor the memory of her late husband, U.S. Senator John Heinz. Administered by the Heinz Family Foundation, they celebrate the accomplishments and spirit of the senator in the areas of: Arts and Humanities; Environment; Human Condition; Public Policy; and Technology, the Economy and Employment.
 
Recipients will receive their awards in Pittsburgh on April 3, 2014.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Kim O’Dell, The Heinz Family Foundation


A note from your Pop City editors...

After seven years, Pop City’s Innovation News Editor Deb Smit bids you a fond farewell as she moves on to new challenges.
 
Pop City Managing Editor Erin Keane Scott and Matt Wein will be taking over this space in the interim. You can continue to forward innovation, tech and hiring news to erin@popcitymedia.com.

It has been a pleasure to serve the entrepreneurial community of Pittsburgh.  

Who's hiring in Pittsburgh? Duolingo, Lightwave, Animal Friends and more

Each week Pop City reports on the latest in company hiring news.
 
Language learning company Duolingo in Shadyside received major funding this week and plans to add another 16 people to its workforce, engineers of all shapes and sizes.
 
Lightwave International, an international company that produces laser light shows for concerts, tours, films and more is expanding its management team. The company is hiring in three areas: business operations, a production manager and a business development manager. The company is also looking to expand its board of advisors.
 
RE2, a robotics engineering company located in Lawrenceville, has two openings for engineers. 
 
Kopp Glass, an international company and manufacturer of specialized molded glass lenses that has been based in Pittsburgh for 85 years, is hiring a marketing communications specialist.
 
Continuum Managed Services located in Cranberry Township, an IT and managed services software company,is hiring full- and part-time service desk technicians and service desk supervisors.
 
The Oncology Nursing Society, a professional organization located in RIDC Park West that promotes excellence in oncology nursing and quality cancer care, is looking for an editorial assistant to work within the publishing department for the official nursing journals of ONS. ONS also is looking for a director of development, web developers and a project manager, and the affiliated Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation is looking for a customer service representative.
 
Animal Friends, committed to nurturing and promoting the health and well-being of animals in south western Pennsylvania, has eight full- and part-time positions including: canine behavior modification specialist, maintenance technician, adoption counselor, retail associate and a low-cost spay/neuter community outreach intern.
 
The Three Rivers Workforce Investment Board seeks a director of youth programs. The ideal candidate will strategize and lead the development of an effective youth workforce development program.
 
Have hiring news? Contact Pop City and send the career links!

Writer: Deb Smit

 
 
 
 

Duolingo lands $20 million. Named best ed app in the world by TechCrunch.

Language learning startup Duolingo remains on a winning streak with the announcement of millions in venture funding and another big award.
 
The Pittsburgh company landed its largest investment to date, $20 million, and received a 2013 “Crunchie” as the best education app in the world from TechCrunch. Founder and CEO, Luis von Ahn, generally a low kind of guy, expressed his elation.
 
“It’s pretty rare to see (Crunchie) winners that are not based in Silicon Valley,” says von Ahn. “We’re proud of the fact we won and we’re not that.”
 
TechCrunch touted Duolingo for its ability to teach real language skills through mobile tech in a “gamified” and fun way. The app currently is 20 million users strong and growing.
 
“There are more people learning a language on Duolingo than in the whole U.S. school system,” says von Ahn, who estimates that number at eight million.
 
The funding round was lead by Silicon Valley venture firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. Duolingo has previously raised $3.3 million lead by Union Square in 2011 and a $15 million round lead by NEA. Ashton Kutcher and author Tim Ferriss are also investors.
 
Big hiring will take place this year, von Ahn adds. Duolingo will add 16 to its staff of 34 people. It will also begin developing a language certification app that will allow users to take a standardized language test on their smartphone for only $20. Language certification standardized tests usually cost hundreds of dollar, he says.
 
Last December Duolingo was named iPhone App of the Year by Apple. The app owes its design and original concept to von Ahn and his CMU student, Severin Hacker.
 
Duolingo works by leading users through lessons and programs using fun games and exercises. As users translate web phrases, both by reading and listening to the language spoken by native speakers, they assist with the translation of web content, a concept known as crowdsourcing.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Luis von Ahn, Duolingo

Yahoo and CMU a potent force for the future of mobile technologies

Yahoo and CMU have joined forces in the development of a new generation of consumer applications for mobile technologies.
 
The collaboration between a tech company and university is the first of its kind in the country, says Justine Cassell, director of CMU’s Human Computer Institute.
 
CMU’s reputation as a powerhouse in the areas of computer science research and machine learning and Yahoo’s mobile technology databanks will generate not only new technologies but jobs for the region.
 
The five-year-partnership is estimated to be worth $10 million. It gives CMU researchers access to Yahoo’s experimental mobile software data in the creation of new products and technologies.
 
In return, Yahoo gains access to human resources at CMU, says Cassel. Yahoo plans on hiring scientists, researchers and practitioners in the area of machine learning and computer interaction as a result of the deal.
 
“They know CMU is stellar in these areas and by many metrics the best,” says Cassell. “This is a way for them to partner with faculty and students to see who is aligned with their interests.”
 
Dubbed Project InMind, the program includes the creation of a Yahoo-sponsored fellowship program at CMU that will provide financial and research support for computer science students and faculty.
 
Yahoo is focused on personalization, the primary focus of the collaboration. In the future, smartphones will predict where you will be driving later in the day and send you information on how to reserve a table at a nearby restaurants, says Cassell.
 
Or your mobile might remind you to re-subscribe for a piece of software on a set date and will increasingly do so without violating your privacy and giving specific access to your data, she adds.
 
The first two awardees are a computer scientist who is looking at how to better target and tailor news deliveries to meet people’s interest. A second researcher is developing usable privacy metrics.
 
CMU will have ownership over all intellectual property created by CMU but Yahoo will own anything developed with the company and will be able to license property owned by CMU.
 
Writer: Debra Smit
Source: Justine Cassel, CMU
 
 

CMU unveils some of the hottest new disruptive technologies in health care

Disruptive isn’t usually a word uttered in the same sentence as good health, but many of the promising new technologies in the health care industry are just that.
 
CMU hosted a day-long conference last week, the third annual Innovation in Health Care Technology Conference, a gathering of health care industry leaders, entrepreneurs and innovators in Pittsburgh who shared what they’re doing to disrupt and transform health care.
 
Experts presented sophisticated solutions that address the growing needs of the industry. Among those in attendance were Body Media (now Jawbone), Omnyx, Rinovum Women’s Health, Cognition Therapeutics, Highmark and Mylan.
 
“If ever there was an industry in need of disruption, it is the health care industry,” says Lynn Banaszak Brusco, executive director of the Disruptive Health Technology Institute at CMU. “Disruptive innovation, based on advances in science and engineering, has already brought lower-cost, quality products to a variety of industries, but health care has not experienced this pioneering drive — until now.”
 
The conference sessions reinforced that the region is worldwide leader for creative ideas that will improve healthcare for patients and the community in the future, she adds.  
 
“The CMU Disruptive Health Technology Institute is working to bring the same disruption to health care. We are researching and deploying new technologies to help reduce health care costs and improve outcomes for patients.”
 
Among the newer companies on hand was South Side-based Proximedics, providers of USB-powered RFID (radio frequency identification) readers that work in tandem with a customized web application, providing clinics and hospitals with solutions for everything from inventory management to device regulation.
 
Presenters included several research projects that are still in development. Body Explorer is a new medical training simulator for educating medical professionals from the University of Pittsburgh's Simulation and Medical Technology R&D Center.

Medical Robotics Technology Center at CMU's Robotics Institute is working on a flexible needle steering system for minimally invasive navigation in the brain.

CMU’s BioPharma and Healthcare Club, a joint graduate student organization of the H. John Heinz III College and Tepper School of Business, hosted the event.

Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Lynn Brusco, CMU
 
 

Who's hiring in Pittsburgh? American Eagle, MWCDC and startups

Each week Pop City reports on the latest company and hiring news.
 
American Eagle’s corporate office on the South Side is hiring for ten positions. The national clothing retailer is actively seeking: an art director; analyst for testing and marketing strategies research; assistant buyer, assistant corporate secretary, manager of development operations, manager of quality control, merchandise planner, senior accountant and senior analyst. AE is also looking for a merchandising intern.
 
lontank, an interactive hardware and software developer on Penn Avenue, is hiring for three positions: interactive technician, studio manager and lead developer.
 
The Mount Washington Community Development Corp. (MWCDC) is looking for its next executive director to lead the community development nonprofit.
 
Touchtown is looking for a “top-notch” senior software engineer to build a new product line for the senior living industry.
 
The American Red Cross in Pittsburgh is hiring a communication specialist with three to five years of experience.
 
Allegheny Intermediate Unit, part of Pennsylvania’s public education system, is currently seeking qualified candidates for various teaching, teacher’s aide, and personal care assistant positions throughout the Allegheny County. 
 
The AIU also has immediate openings for substitute custodians, job coaches and a virtual social studies course facilitator. 

Have hiring news? Email Pop City and send the links!

Writer: Deb Smit
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