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Looking for work? Pittsburgh website posts 30,000 well-paying jobs

If you’re looking for a job—and many are these days—the Allegheny Conference on Community Development lists 30,000 job openings on its job search portal, the Imaginemynewjob.com website.

Wielding a powerful, spider search engine, the site reaches out and gathers all the online job postings within a 71 mile radius of the city. Listings are drawn from Monster, the Pittsburgh Post Gazette and individual company websites; duplicate postings are eliminated, explains Dewitt Peart, executive vice president of economic development and president, Pittsburgh Regional Alliance.
 
“Despite the recession, there are opportunities here,” he explains. “We’ve diversified our base and there’s strength in our diversification. Pittsburgh may be a place you want to consider if you’re looking for a job.”

While Imagine doesn’t offer a breakdown of jobs by type, more than 25,000 are full-time positions and more than half pay $40,000 per year or more. A free service, the website allows job seekers to search for positions based on location, salary range, title, company and job type. Users can establish customized accounts, join the network “Linked In,” listen to podcasts and read more about the region.

October marked the third straight month that Pittsburgh reported strong employment figures, a growth rate of 0.6 percent that was well above the rest of the country, which fell by –0.1 percent.

Launched in September, more than 28,000 people have visited Imagine and stayed more than six minutes. The conference launched a marketing campaign in the Washington D.C. corridor this fall.

 “We’re getting hits from all around the word. The word is spreading and we’re being referred,” Peart adds.

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Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Dewitt Peart, Allegheny Conference on Community Development

Image courtesy Allegheny Conference


Pittsburgh gets a new venture fund for life science startups

Two prominent business leaders have launched a new venture capital fund to help fuel the growth of the life sciences industry in the region.

Peter DeComo and Gary Glausser have joined forces with Corridor Venture Partners, a targeted $50 million fund that will assist early stage biomedical research in the region with gap funding, money to fuel established startups as they advance to the commercialization stage.

“This region is rich in medical device companies,” says an enthusiastic John Manzetti, president and CEO of Pittsburgh Life Sciences Greenhouse. “It’s nice to have a strong life sciences based firm with local partners who know a lot about the community and life sciences in general, and these guys do.”

Both DeComo and Glausser will leave their current jobs by the end of this year to devote time to the enterprise.

DeComo is the CEO of Renal Solutions, which was sold in November 2007 to Fresenius Medical Care of Germany. He will stay on as a consultant to Fresenius  and will continue to serve on the boards of ALung, Thermal Therapeutics, ClearCount and PLSG.

Glausser will remain as a partner with Birchmere Ventures but devote full-time to the new fund. He has more than 25 years of experience as a financial manager, investor and venture capitalist and has served on the boards of Precision Therapeutics and Renal Solutions, to name a few.

There is investment money out there, says DeComo. “This will bring homegrown venture capital to the region, focus on life sciences and hopefully create successful companies that will stay here, employ more people and create wealth.”

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Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Peter DeComo and Gary Glausser, Corridor Venture Partners, John Manzetti, PLSG

Peter DeComo (left) courtesy of Renal Solutions and Gary Glausser courtesy of Birchmere Ventures


My Mobile Witness is your free personal bodyguard

Imagine walking through a dark parking lot and feeling as if you’re being followed. Quickly, you snap a picture of the person behind you before you reach your vehicle. The picture is instantly sent to officials, dated and stamped in case the unthinkable happens.

Pittsburgh-based My Mobile Witness has developed a groundbreaking mobile cell phone technology that may revolutionize personal security and provide law enforcers with irrefutable evidence should you meet with a worst case scenario. Armed with a cell phone, subscribers send phone pictures or texts of suspicious situations--like a license plate or person--to a secure server before something happens.

The information is stored for 6 months before it’s destroyed, evidence that is available immediately to law officials in an emergency. Unlike dialing 911, it allows users to non-invasively register a concern without engaging an official response.

The idea was developed by Pittsburghers and Hempfield High School friends Marc Anthony and Scott Bullens. They were opening a real estate office when they began pondering the nature of the business—how agents, particularly women, meet with complete strangers in isolated locations.

With the help of Ron Knight, a former FBI agent who participated in such high profile crimes as Waco, Columbine and Ruby Ridge, they developed Witness and launched it in October. Photos are assessable only to law enforcement officials through Fusion Centers, federally funded data centers set up after 9-11 to assist in the coordination of digital traffic.

“I’ve had cases in my career where the outcome could have been significantly different if we’d had this tool,” explains Knight, chief security officer. “There’s no more compelling evidence than a photograph. I’m sending my 18-year-old son off to college and he is signing up whether he likes it or not.”

If the tool takes off, cell phones might become critical leverage in certain situations, helping to deter crime, he adds. “If people knew it was out there, some crimes might not occur.”

A virtual company, Witness employs 8 technical employees and several law enforcement consultants. The company hopes to hire and open a Pittsburgh office in the near future.

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Writer: Deb Smit

Source: Marc Anthony and Ron Knight, My Mobile Witness






Pittsburgh’s FlashBox preserves better party memories

If you thought reality TV was riveting, imagine your wedding or event captured by  Pittsburgh-based Flashbox Media.

Developed by three Carnegie Mellon alumni, FlashBox is a portable, interactive kiosk, strategically positioned at a party, that captures video and gains momentum as the evening wears on. By the end, there’s no telling what the video footage may reveal, especially if alcoholic beverages are being consumed.

Co-founder Michael Mandel, chief technology officer, piloted the beta version at his own wedding. “It wasn’t until I got the video back that I realized how different (the footage) was (from a professional videographer),” he says.

“There is no pressure, no one walking up and pointing a camera in your face. You get a cross-section of the wedding you normally don’t get to see—relatives singing songs passed down in the family, friends telling stories, just talking. When I look at this in 20 years, I’ll say, yeah, this was what it was really like to be there.”

The kiosk preserves better memories by capturing the essence of the occasion rather than a deer in the headlights performance, the creators say. Individuals or groups are encouraged to revisit the kiosk with commentary, skits or songs. The final product is a professionally packaged and edited DVD in a keepsake case, a point of pride for the FlashBox makers who have professional television production backgrounds.  
 
Currently only available in the Pittsburgh region, FlashBox markets its technology directly and through local bridal fairs and wedding planners. In the first year, the company booked about 45 events, mostly weddings, bar and bat mizvahs and milestone birthdays and anniversaries. The company hopes to attend 100 to 200 events in the coming year.

To see FlashBox in action, click here.

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Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Michael Mandel, FlashBox Media


Image courtesy FlashBox Media

The hottest gift for the holidays is giving--a Pittsburgh roundup

No gift quite equals the gift of giving, especially in difficult economic times.

Which is why this year’s hottest gift may be to a favorite charity or green enterprise. May the following list guide you to charitable ways in Pittsburgh to make a difference this holiday season.

Neighbor-Aid is a special emergency fund created to support nonprofit organizations struggling to meet the demand from families and individuals as a result of the financial crisis. Administered by the Pittsburgh Foundation, Elsie Hillman, the United Way of Allegheny County and others, donations will help those struggling to pay rent, mortgages and utility bills.  To donate online, click here.

The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh is raising money to build and sustain Pittsburgh’s community libraries through a contribution to Libraries for LIFE. The Richard King Mellon Foundation has agreed to match every dollar raised for the capital campaign up to one million dollars. For more information, click here.

Investing in Pittsburgh Cares is an investment in the Pittsburgh community. Your tax-deductible donation can help to build a kitchen for a community center, provide a healthy lunch to low-income seniors, or offer a scholarship for a student to participate in our Pittsburgh Young Leaders Academy. For more information, click here.

Join Sustainable Pittsburgh and help to promote a greener, more sustainable Pittsburgh. Click here for details.

…and then in a twinkling, peace filled the air. Happy Holidays one and all!

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How Pittsburgh manufacturing stays strong in tough times

Despite the downward dive of the rest of the nation, manufacturing in Western Pennsylvania is looking up.

A recent survey of 100 manufacturers here reports a substantial increase in employment and a potential rise in future employment. A substantial majority, 86 percent, will expand operations in the coming year, up from 71 percent in 2007.

Meanwhile, in the rest of the nation, manufacturing employment has declined 6 percent nationwide, according to the U.S. Dept. of Labor Statistics. The regional survey is conducted annually by Alpern Rosenthal and the University of Pittsburgh Institute for Entrepreneurial Excellence.

“Really it is the tale of two stories,” notes Larry Barger, director of manufacturing services for the Pittsburgh office of Alpern. “The survey is reflective of the third quarter. While many had a good 2008, they’re looking ahead with caution to 2009.”

Then again, the diversification of industry in the region has contributed to its steady growth, he adds.

“We’re not as tied into the auto industry or steel as we were years ago,” Barger says. “This area is entrepreneurial. Our region has seen a number of spinoffs and startups and those companies are today’s success story. It’s fair to say that the diversity and depth of specialized, high tech manufacturers may set us apart from other parts of the country.”

Some survey highlights:

·    Over the past three years, 78 percent of the respondents said they’ve increased employment. Some 91 percent expect to increase employment in the next three years.

·    Revenues have increase for about 85 percent over the last three years.

·    A total 56 percent expect net operating profits next year.

·    Manufacturers cite three positive reasons for operating a business in Pennsylvania—a superior, trained workforce, relative low cost of manufacturing and superior transportation.

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Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Larry Barger, Alpern Rosenthal


Image courtesy Alpern Rosenthal

Instant podcast gratification the latest at Talkshoe

The Pittsburgh voice of audio social media, Talkshoe, has launched a new service for audiophiles on the go.

Until now, hosts had to schedule their podcast episodes on the Talkshoe website or through Facebook, but with Instant Talkcast there’s a new immediacy to the spoken word.  The service is recorded live through your cell phone and it’s available to all subscribers and through iTunes.

“Now you can literally grab your cell phone, call into our system and initiate an Internet telecast on the fly,” says Dave Nelsen, founder and CEO. “It’s a much richer, more instantaneous way of connecting.”

Instant Talkcast enables users to weigh in the minute they leave the movie theater or sporting event. It’s the voice form of twittering, the popular website where online users post quick, stream of consciousness word-bytes.

Talkshoe uses the same technology—really simple syndication (RSS) feeds—to broadcast to subscribers. The format allows up to 300 people to join in a conversation live. Or subscribers can listen to a recorded feed.

“This definitely bumps social audio media to the next level as people talk, debate and interact with one another,” says Nelsen. “Consumers have never had this ability to teleconference with one another before.”

Talkshoe currently receives over 1 million caller minutes a month. Since early 2007, more than 100,000 calls have been recorded on TalkShoe and they've been listened to 18 million times, Nelsen says. Revenues are generated through monthly subscriptions from business users (the service is free to individuals) and short audio ads placed in recordings.

“It’s exciting to see how a little company in Wexford has become an interesting part of the social media movement,” says Nelsen. Talkshoe is supported by Innovation Works and Blue Tree Allied Angels.

To receive Pop City free each week, click here.

Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Dave Nelsen, Talkshoe

Image of Dave Nelsen courtesy of Talkshoe



Pittsburgh Signs Project lets the signs speak—so what are they saying?

We are all drawn to signs.

That is exactly how four people, particularly passionate about signs in our region, found one another. Together they started a website and the Pittsburgh Signs Project was born, a labor of love that attracted others to join in a like-minded, crowd-sourced endeavor to collect and photograph old and new pieces of our region’s history that tell our personal stories and reflect the visual identity of our communities.  

This month the five-year project became available as a full-color book, Pittsburgh Signs Project: 250 Signs of Western Pennsylvania, published by Carnegie Mellon University Press. The book highlights the photographs of 60 local photographers and the work of the four authors: Elizabeth Perry, technology and integration specialist at The Ellis School and her husband Mark Stroup, instructor with Goodwill of Southwestern Pa.; Jennifer Baron, editor of Pop City’s Pop Filter and Development News, and her husband, Greg Langel, media and marketing manager at The Frick.

From the Modern Café on the North Side to the Electric Banana and the flying cow, the signs present an eclectic and comforting mix, “a mongrelization of type-styles, graphics and fashions. The futuristic becomes the modern becomes the dated becomes the retro,” Stroup writes. 

“Signs evoke many different reactions in us,” explains Perry. “Signs act as crossroads, a nexus for the community, a source for our memories. For me, it’s about being present in the world, noticing what is around me and appreciating it.”

The book is available at Carnegie Mellon's bookstore, and at the Mattress Factory and Heinz History Center shops, and will be sold Dec. 15th at the Making Connections event at Carnegie Science Center. The project is supported in part by a regional award from Pittsburgh 250 Community Connections and The Sprout Fund.

Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Elizabeth Perry, Pittsburgh Signs Project

Image courtesy Larry Rippel



Pittsburgh KIVA founder presents the world’s first entrepreneurial charity

Billed as a mix of Google with the do-good ethos of U2’s Bono, KIVA's message is coming to Pittsburgh.

Pittsburgh native and co-founder of the San Francisco-based non-profit KIVA Jessica Jackley Flannery will speak at the Regional Learning Alliance in Cranberry Township on Dec. 16th about the world’s first person-to-person micro-lending website that empowers individuals to lend money directly to entrepreneurs in developing countries. Flannery, 31, is a 1996 graduate of North Allegheny High School and grew up in Franklin Park.

The concept has generated a storm of media publicity from the Wall Street Journal to Oprah Winfrey.

“The Regional Learning Alliance is proud to offer a program on both philanthropy and the spirit of entrepreneurship during this holiday season with a native that Pittsburgh can be so very proud of," says Justin Griffith, general manager. "She has taken an idea and, in just a few short years, created an organization that has changed the lives of people all around the world."

Kiva has connected with truly promising, real entrepreneurs in impoverished nations worldwide and established a data-rich, transparent lending platform to enable people to connect with and help aspiring businesspeople in need.

Like a social networking site, Kiva posts profiles of potential borrowers and lenders select an individual or group. A little goes a long way in a developing country. Phebe, a widow, farmer and mother of seven in Cameroon, hopes to raise $975 to buy fresh manure, fertilizer, seeds and chemicals to improve her farm and sell crops to the community.

Instead of donations, lenders offer small loans that are sent directly to a microfinance institution in the borrower’s country. The bank monitors the transaction and ensures the loan is repaid. Ninety percent of all active loans are paid on time and the default rate is less than 1 percent. The money is then recycled and loaned again, although that step of the process is still being worked out.

“The Entrepreneurial Spirit” will run from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and includes breakfast, a keynote speech and roundtable lunch discussion. The cost is $70 for the whole program but those wishing to attend only a portion of the day can do so for $35. Twenty percent will be donated to KIVA.

Registration is by mail through the RLA website, click here.


Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Justin Griffith, Regional Learning Alliance

Image of Jessica in Tanzania courtesy KIVA

Pitt takes latest bioscience research on the road to region's schools

University of Pittsburgh unveiled a 70-foot mobile science laboratory that will give K-12 students hands-on knowledge of the latest medical research and advanced biology.

The three-year program was initiated by the Pittsburgh Life Sciences Greenhouse and involves Pitt, the Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative Inc. (PTEI) and the Pittsburgh-based Lyceum Group. The mobile lab will serve 4,000 Allegheny County students and extend beyond to underserved rural districts in Washington, Green and Fayette counties and north to Meadville and Erie.

“Our role is to bridge what’s going on in our research labs with high-quality research that’s changing the face of science everyday with what teachers in our region are required to teach,” says Alison Slinskey Legg, director of outreach for the Department of Biology at Pitt. “This is a fully functional state-of-the-art laboratory.”

The lab contains 26 work stations for 52 students and an upper staging for an additional 10 students and teachers. The interior is enclosed in glass on one side, keeping the temperature constant while providing natural light “so students don’t feel like they’re in a tin can,” says Legg.

The region joins 20 other cities across the country in offering the latest research through mobile programs. Student activities include an opportunity to diagnose and control fictional viral epidemics to an investigation of natural selection in gut organisms.

The University’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) purchased the mobile laboratory for $120,000 and will support its operation with $25,000 annually. The program hopes to hire more staff and raise additional funds in the coming year.

“We need to show kids that science is fun by high school, middle school, and, ideally, elementary school, if we want to foster a pipeline of new scientists,” says Steven Reis, director of CTSI.

Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Alison Slinskey Legg, University of Pittsburgh, Steven Reis, CTSI

Image courtesy University of Pittsburgh


Guided by progressive principles, Newton Consulting growing

A teacher once told Rick Newton that he should be able to sum up his life calling with a single phrase.

“I’m a vision implementer,” he says. “I have the ability to understand another’s business vision, adopt it as my own and get from point A to point B.”

With a refreshing business model and progressive principles, the IT consulting company has grown in four quick years into an $8 million business with 25 full-time and 25 sub-contracted employees, all of whom work virtually from home or in local coffee shops.

To top it off, Newton Consulting won a Pittsburgh Technology Council Tech 50 award this year in the service provider category.

"What has been tremendously satisfying to me is that this model, built on customer focus, principles and giving away the company, has been successful," says Newton, who strives for a personal and professional balance, working from a carriage house on an old country estate in Washington County. "As the company took off, I had to ask myself whether I wanted a large piece of a small pie or a small piece of a big pie."

Opting for the latter, Newton's virtual model allows the company to pass savings on to customers and profits on to employees, thereby creating a “Wal-Mart-like” low margin model that attracts and retains quality talent. With a strong team of top tier consultants, Newton serves both large and small companies like GlaxoSmithKline, Walt Disney World, UnivarUSA, and local software company, ANSYS

“Newton is not the typical consulting company,” reflects Gregg Gantwarg, vice president of marketing communications, who worked for Newton while launching his own company, Virtual Edge, based on a virtual model. “It’s a very selfless setup. Not the typical corporate line.”

To receive Pop City free each week, click here.


Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Rick Newton, Gregg Gantwarg, Newton Consulting

Image courtesy Newton Consulting

Pittsburgh indicators show economic clout despite national outlook

Despite the downward spiral of the nation’s economy, Pittsburgh leaders express  optimism that the region’s job performance showed strength in September.

While the full impact of the national economy has yet to be measured locally, PittsburghToday reports that the 2008 September job figures posted a record high compared to a national trend of declining jobs. PT's figures are based on the latest U.S. Dept. of Labor statistics.

Pittsburgh gained 7,000 jobs between September 2007 and September 2008 while many major metropolitan regions lost tens of thousands of jobs. In addition, September 2008 was the first time the region had more jobs than prior to the 2001-2002 recession.

“The Pittsburgh region continues to buck the national trend,” says Harold Miller, president of Future Strategies LLC. “Although the job data were gathered before the recent Wall St. meltdown, the two major industries driving our economy – health care and higher education – will probably not be affected significantly. Even UPMC’s reduction in employees last week, while very unfortunate, leaves health care with hundreds more jobs than it had a year ago.”

In times like these, people need to read the numbers carefully, leaders add. PittsburghToday attempts to explain the often muddled number game that can distort what's going on in cities in transition like Pittsburgh.

For example, a region’s unemployment rate is a terrible indicator of labor force growth or loss, says Miller. Technically it could signal either total jobs lost or gained or an increase or decline in the number of people looking for work. Seasonal adjustments, like the typical back-to-school drop in employment in the fall, contribute to misunderstandings.

“In times like these we need to be very cautious and not jump to any conclusions,” notes John Craig, president of Pittsburgh Regional Indicators. “If this is a recession, Pittsburgh compared to other places is rather well placed. We have a unique history of our own and it remains to be seen what we will see.”

To read the Pop City story on PittsburghToday, click here.

Writer: Deb Smit
Source: John Craig, Pittsburgh Today; Harold Miller, Future Strategies


Pop City Green Report with the latest sustainable news

The ever widening swath of green continues to spread throughout our region with a number of new initiatives, programs, even a glog.

The City of Pittsburgh has created a new staff position, a sustainability coordinator for a new Office of Sustainability and Energy Efficiency. Lindsay Baxter, who assisted on mapping the Pittsburgh Climate Action Plan, will help propel the region toward continued green growth. She was a former member of the group Clean Air-Cool Planet.

“We made great strides to reduce our city’s carbon footprint, and we will continue to do what it takes to help our region create green collar jobs and improve our residents’ quality of life,” says Mayor Luke Ravenstahl.

University of Pittsburgh student Paul Trichon has created a green blog, or glog, a social networking site that connects users and helps to increase environmental awareness. Check it out here.

Chatham University has purchased a 2009 Toyota Prius police car. The purchase was one of several green initiatives recently launched at the school.

The university’s new Eden Hall Farm Campus in Richland Township serves as a living laboratory for students studying women and environmental sustainability. In addition, Chatham serves locally-grown, hormone-free food in its dining hall and waste is composted through a pilot project with Parkhurst and Agrecycle Inc. of Pittsburgh.

Kudos to Palate Partners and Dreadnought Wines in the Strip District who are helping local businesses to go greener, encouraging the use of real plates and glass instead of styrofoam containers and helping businesses to recycle.

A $200,000 grant from the Heinz Endowments will sponsor the Allegheny River Stewardship Project, a community based environmental health program that studies water contamination in the Allegheny River, a flagship program of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health’s Center for Healthy Environments and Communities (CHEC).

Writer: Deb Smit
Sources: Mayor Luke Ravenstahl; Walt Fowler, Chatham University; Deb Mortillaro, Palate Partners; Tim Koncewicz; Heinz Endowments

2008 National Park(ing) Day project by artist Sean Derry


And the winner is...Pittsburgh Tech Council honors top companies

Pittsburgh’s brightest tech stars gathered this month to celebrate 50 of the region’s stellar companies and the 25th anniversary of the Pittsburgh Technology Council.

Seven companies and a CEO received Tech 50 Awards during an elegant ceremony at the Carnegie Music Hall in Oakland. Featured speaker and Pittsburgh native Regis McKenna, Silicon Valley marketing guru and author, offered sage words as the community strives to take its place among global leaders of technology.

“Innovation today requires a community and culture of big and small companies and universities working together,” McKenna noted. “The most innovative product development comes from companies that are less than 5 years old with less than 250 employees. Small companies become the incubators of larger companies.”

McKenna, whose high-tech marketing firm helped to rocket startups like Apple, America Online and Genentech to the top, encouraged the region to work together to embrace the innovative spirit of entrepreneurs.

PTC Council President and CEO Audrey Russo (see this week's Pop City story on her here) applauded the region’s efforts this year and reflected on the future of renewable energy and biotechnology for the region.

“As the world looks for clean technology, so they will increasingly look toward Pittsburgh,” she said. “If we get it right, Pittsburgh’s brightest days are just around the corner.”

This year’s winners of the 12th annual Tech 50 Awards included:

For a complete listing of the Tech 50 nominees, click here.

To receive Pop City free each week, click here.

Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Audrey Russo and Kevin Lane, PTC, Regis McKenna, Regis McKenna Inc.

Image courtesy Pittsburgh Technology Council

New weekly online magazine Keystone Edge captures the story of the PA economy

From Erie to Philadelphia, a new economy is emerging in Pennsylvania and Keystone Edge plans to tell the story.

The new online magazine is the ninth and latest publication created by Detroit-based Issue Media Group, a company dedicated to promoting an alternative urban narrative in cities and regions from Michigan to Pennsylvania and beyond. 

Pop City Media was among the first e-zines launched by IMG more than 2 years ago. Other publications include Metromode in Southeast Michigan, SoapBox in Cincinnati and Capital Gains in Lansing.

Keystone Edge promises the latest news on emerging tech sectors and industries in Pennsylvania. The e-zine is available for free by email each Thursday and will feature fresh, original writing, creative photography, videos and blogs as it highlights innovative new businesses, cool places to live and creative people behind the scenes across the state.

"Alternative energy, robotics, advanced healthcare, sustainable building and urban design—these are the industries of the future and we want to show where and how they are emerging here in Pennsylvania,” says John Davidson, managing editor. “There's a lot to cover."

In addition to Davidson, who is based in Philadelphia, the staff includes Joseph Plummer, a former Pittsburgh Post Gazette editor and Pittsburgh Technology Council executive, and Michael Persico, a Philadelphia-based freelance photographer.

"We speak to, and with, the leaders of the future economy," adds Brian Boyle, publisher of KE and co-founder of IMG. "Keystone Edge is about challenging how you see your state and its future."

To receive Keystone Edge free each week, click here.

Writer: Deb Smit
Source: John Davidson, Keystone Edge; Brian Boyle, Issue Media Group

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