| Follow Us:
Downtown Reflections. Photograph by Brian Cohen.
Downtown Reflections. Photograph by Brian Cohen. | Show Photo

Downtown & The Cultural District : Pittsburgh Innovates

329 Downtown & The Cultural District Articles | Page: | Show All

Who's hiring in Pittsburgh? Cardinal Resources, Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and more

This week’s Pop City hiring report highlights a slew of jobs, from 12 positions at Cardinal Resources to 18+ at Ansaldo, three at the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and another at Point Park University.
 
South Side-based Cardinal Resources is bringing cleaner water to the world through its patented Red Bird System, a solar powered, community-sized water purifying system. The company recently won a $9 million contract to install 12 of its water purification systems in Nigeria, which will create 12 jobs, primarily for engineers and technicians.
 
The company is also opening a manufacturing center next door, the former Hall Industries property, where it will begin building the filters for the Red Bird units later this month, reports Kevin Jones, president.  
 
Pittsburgh Cultural Trust reports three openings in its marketing and communications department. The arts nonprofit is looking for a Director of Public Relations, Show Marketing Manager and Digital Designer. 
 
The Director of Public Relations is responsible for developing public relations campaigns for Trust presentations and oversees the overall marketing strategy to publicize all events, including the placement of advance features, reviews, and artist interviews. A degree in marketing or communications or related and three years experience is preferred.
 
The Show Marketing Manager will coordinate all aspects of marketing for the Trust. A degree in marketing or communications or related and three years experience is preferred.
 
The Digital Designer will be responsible for designing, writing, trafficking and gaining approval
for all organizational e-marketing messages. The Digital Designer works on a number of print,
video and multimedia projects.
 
Ansaldo, a supplier of high-speed railway and urban transportation technology, has 18 openings in its Pittsburgh office, most of them in the engineering field. Jobs include software and project engineers, sales and telecommunications engineers. Ansaldo emerged from Union Switch & Signal in 2009, a company originally founded by George Westinghouse in 1881.
 
Point Park University is hiring a Director of Recruitment for its School of Business who will be responsible for developing and implementing a comprehensive recruitment plan in collaboration with the Admissions offices and the Dean of the School of Communication.

Have hiring news? Email Pop City!

Writer: Deb Smit

Point Park's president peddling Pittsburgh to students through a city bike tour

Point Park president Paul Hennigan is taking the college tour to the next level.
 
By bike, actually.  The Pittsburgh native and avid biker decided last year that the best way to indoctrinate incoming students—especially those working on campus as RAs—was to personally take them on a bike tour of the city.
 
“It’s an eye opening, fun experience for many of the students,” says Hennigan. “As our student ambassadors, this is a great thing to do and know about.”
 
Hennigan meets with the students twice before the tour and they are given an assignment: a one-page summary of the history behind the points of interest along the way.
 
How did the Hot Metal Bridge get its name? What’s the story behind the South Side Boat launch? How did the Pittsburgh Technology Center come to be?
 
“I’ve watched the evolution of this city and the creation of these bike trails.,” he tells the students. “I know these stories. Now its your job to learn the history.”
 
The tour begins at the Golden Triangle bike rental downtown and continues along the Eliza Furnace Trail to the Hot Metal Bridge. Crossing the bridge, the tour continues west on the South Side Trail to the Duquesne Incline, veers sharply left on the hairpin turn that winds up to the Fort Pitt Bridge, crosses the river and traverses Point State Park.
 
From there its over the Duquesne Bridge to the north side and onto Washington’s Landing where the tour breaks for lunch. Then its back across the Fort Duquesne Bridge to The Point and back to the bike rental.
 
Hennigan’s favorite stop is on the Hot Metal Bridge, which he points out was once a conduit that helped moved steel across the river.
 
“We stop in the middle of the bridge. To the right is the gleaming metropolis, to the left is nothing,” he says. “It’s a great juxtaposition.” 
 
The city is our campus, Hennigan says.
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Paul Hennigan
 

Who's hiring in Pittsburgh? Google and PNC for starters...

The top hiring story for this week is the news of Google Pittsburgh hiring eight.
 
Earlier media reports that Google  may be moving from Bakery Square were inaccurate, reports Jordan Newsman, Google spokesman.
 
“We are definitely growing, but we have no plans to expand,” he said. “We have been hiring for awhile and we continue to grow. There’s a ton of great talent in the city.”
 
The company, currently at 220 people, is hiring for a variety of technical positions, engineers all, including software engineers, data scientists and evaluators, product managers, system engineers and technical program managers.
 
Google is also seeking a human resources business partner.

PNC is posting 340+ jobs across all sectors, everything from mortgage and technical specialists to business bankers and systems analysts. 
 
Sierra w/o Wires reports this week the hiring of eight people, everything from experienced engineers to an entry level support analyst. 
 
While construction on the Shop N Save grocery store in the Hill District has been pushed back to 2013, Massaro, general contractor, reports that interested parties will be collecting applications for a number of construction, hospitality, restaurant, banking and grocery store jobs opening up.
 
The Hill House will hold an orientation and application intake session Wednesday night, Aug. 1, at the Hill House, 1 Hope Center, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. 

And from last week...
As reported last week, Aquion Energy is hiring more than 20 people including a director of research and development. In fact, the company, which plans to establish a manufacturing center in Pittsburgh, is always on the lookout for intelligent, committed innovative thinkers to join their world-class team of scientists, engineers and business people. 
 
Hundreds of jobs are projected at Aquion by 2014; current postings are in every area for those with extensive experience in the fields of electrochemistry, materials science, manufacturing, mechanical design, fabrication, electrical engineering, chemical engineering and physics.
 
Avere Systems, developers of high performance storage solutions for data enterprise centers, is at 75 and continues to grow. The company has 10 job openings including: product marketing manager, technical writer, regional sales manager, inside sales rep and various engineers. 
 
The Pittsburgh headquarter of ANSYS in Canonsburg is always hiring, the company reports. Currently the developer of engineering simulation software has more than a dozen postings for its home office, including software developers, engineers and human resources.

Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Google Pittsburgh, PNC Bank, Sierra w/o Wires, Aquion Energy, Avere Systems, ANSYS and ImaginePittsburghJobs.com
 

Who's hiring in Pittsburgh?

This week Pop City begins a regular roundup of just who’s hiring in Pittsburgh.
 
Whether your company is hiring one or many, we encourage you to contact us for inclusion in our regular list. We'll report on a handful of companies or more looking for talent. Up this week:
 
Aquion Energy is hiring more than 20 people including a director of research and development. In fact, the company, which plans to establish a manufacturing center in Pittsburgh, is always on the lookout for intelligent, committed innovative thinkers to join their world-class team of scientists, engineers and business people. 
 
Hundreds of jobs are projected at Aquion by 2014; current postings are in every area for those with extensive experience in the fields of electrochemistry, materials science, manufacturing, mechanical design, fabrication, electrical engineering, chemical engineering and physics.
 
Avere Systems, developers of high performance storage solutions for data enterprise centers, is at 75 and continues to grow. The company has 10 job openings including: product marketing manager, technical writer, regional sales manager, inside sales rep and various engineers. 
 
The Pittsburgh headquarter of ANSYS in Canonsburg is always hiring, the company reports. Currently the developer of engineering simulation software has more than a dozen postings for its home office, including software developers, engineers and human resources.
 
News radio station 1020 KDKA Pittsburgh is looking for an afternoon Show Host to anchor the KDKA Afternoon News. The position calls for a talent with a distinctive style, someone with strong writing skills and the creative dexterity to go from a discussion of pop culture to breaking news.
 
Dobil Laboratories in Pittsburgh, an audiovisual systems integrator since 1971, is hiring experienced AV technicians and project managers. Email resumes to info@dobil.com

And last but not least, MAYA, design consultancy and technology research lab now housed at Four Gateway Center, is hiring designers, researchers and engineers. Check it out here.
 
 
Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Aquion Energy, Avere Systems, ANSYS, CBS News, Dobil Labs and ImaginePittsburghJobs.com

Sprout announces a call to action for our SiX events and winning project(s)

Hundreds of ideas sprang forth at the kick-off social innovation eXchange (SiX) on civic design and placemaking held yesterday at Point Park University.

That was just the beginning. The Sprout Fund, a partner in the event, stands ready to turn some of these ideas into innovative community solutions and invites the community to get involved. To see the first SiX idea that will move forward, go here and learn how you can join other thought leaders in producing good civic design solutions for our region. All the final ideas and concept posters from yesterday can be seen on this site.

Stay tuned to Pop City for more information on the event, including a video on the ideation session hosted by the LUMA Institute. And look for three more SiX events rolling out this year and how you can get involved.

SiX is brought to you by the Pittsburgh Foundation and the Sprout Fund in concert with Pop City and with support from the Buhl Foundation.



Photo of SiX event by Tracy Certo

Fitting Group wins Pixie for "Brilliant" video for Pittsburgh Social Venture Partners

Fitting Group is up to their old ANT-ics, winning two Pixie Awards, honoring outstanding work in graphics, effects and animation by the American Pixel Academy.

They won a gold for the “Brilliant” video  for Pittsburgh Social Venture Partners which uses ants as its theme in an inspiring and clever message to urge people to join PSVP. (We highly recommend viewing the video.)

"Simplicity works. In this case, it works very well," said the judges, who also commended the excellent use of type.

“Evoking emotion through music and typographic animation is very powerful, and although we won an award for the work, we are equally proud that the ant video succeeded in showcasing PSVP’s worthy mission and got them some much deserved attention, says Belinda Yeager Carter of Fitting Group.
 
Fitting Group also scooped up a platinum award for the “Connect to Greatness” video for the Mason School of Business at The College of William & Mary.



Writer: Tracy Certo
Source: Belinda Yeager Carter


Social media users at the ready: it's almost time for PodCamp Pittsburgh

Share it. Like it. Retweet it.

Social media is about all interaction and so is PodCamp Pittsburgh.
 
The self-described “un-conference” is back September 17-18, giving Pittsburghers of all technical abilities a new chance to talk new media. 
 
The free event is designed to cover a range of topics of interest to casual users, bloggers, programmers, business owners and others. 
 
Now in its sixth year, PodCamp is known for its laid-back approach and open discussions between attendees and speakers. 
 
Popular sessions in previous years featured the KISS Morning Freak Show hosts (avid users of social media) and local blogger Virginia Montanez a.k.a. PittGirl.
 
PodCamp attracts a healthy mix of old hands and social media newbies, says Missy Sorg, a member of the organizing team.  For Sorg, the people make the event.
 
“The nice thing is that it’s completely our city.  We have local presenters and local attendees,” she says.  “It’s for everybody.  You can be an individual, a business, a newbie, or someone concretely in social media.”
 
This year PodCamp moves down the street from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh to Point Park University.  The new location offers more space for the event, including overflow rooms with live video feed, and a separate lunch area for continued conversation. 
 
It’s not too late to present at PodCamp yourself. Submit your session topic by August 31.  PodCamp Pittsburgh will announce this year’s sessions on September 1. 
 
Writer: Lindsay Derda
Source: Missy Sorg, PodCamp Pittsburgh

Focus on the environment: clean energy panel and Marcellus Shale

Two of the hottest topics--Marcellus Shale and clean energy--will be the focus of two different environmental events in the next few weeks.

The Carnegie Science Center will host Dr. Charles E. Jones, a geologist from the Department of Geology and Planetary Science at the University of Pittsburgh, for a discussion about Marcellus Shale and what it means for western Pennsylvania.

As part of the Science & Society Town Square lecture series, attendees can listen and discuss the science relevant to Shale and the future of Pennsylvania's economy and environment.

"It will be covering the basic science," Jones says, such as how and when the Shale formed and why it's full of organic matter.  The audience will learn more about the Shale, he notes,so "if someone wants to drill on their land, they can ask better questions." 

The lecture will be held Thursday, March 24 from 7 to 9 p.m. Registration is $12 for Science Center members and $15 for non-members. Coffee and dessert are included. Click here to register.

On April 3, PennFuture hosts the 2011 Southwest Pennsylvania Global Warming Conference: Clean Energy for a Cool Pittsburgh.

"Clean energy is a really important part of the global warming debate,"  says Tiffany Hickman, spokesperson for PennFuture,. "Changing how and what kind of energy we use is the most important thing we can do to combat global warming, because the energy that we use currently in this country contributes so much to heat trapping gases."

The Conference features a list of local, state and national speakers. They include Kate Gordon, vice president for energy policy at the Center for American Progress; U.S. Representative Mike Doyle, a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and the subcommittees on Communications and Technology and Energy and Power; and Dr. Robert Sroufe, director of sustainability at the Beard Institute at Duquesne University.

"I think Pittsburgh is poised right now to make a big difference for the environment" Hickman adds. "For Pittsburgh to take a stance now on clean energy is going to put it far above its competition in other cities. It's really important for us to set a precedent here, especially with our legacy of dirty energy."

Learn more by attending the Conference on Sunday, April 3 from 1 to 5:30 p.m. at Duquesne University's Power Center. Registration is free to PennFuture members and students with an ID and $10 for others. Click here for more information and to register.

Writer: Alex Audia
Source: Tiffany Hickman, PennFuture




An app for those nasty potholes; Deeplocal sells transit app RouteShout

Just in time for the spring thaw comes a new weapon against  Pittsburgh potholes, a smartphone app that tracks their location and subtly takes the city to task for leaving them unattended over time.

Carnegie Mellon University's RODAS Project--that's Road Damage Assessment System--gives GPS-linked smartphone users the tools to snap pictures of potholes and upload them on Facebook. The photos are then automatically tagged on an online map, marked by bright red dots, creating a virtual overview of potholes to alert officials (and drivers) where the potholes are.

The project, started last summer, was the original idea of Chilean Heinz grad Veronica Acha-Alvarez and inspired by a similar successful project in Chile. The Chilean app offers contests, (subtly timed with local elections) to identify the largest potholes.

"We are creating a secure, independent source of information about potholes that can be used to alert government agencies and to monitor their response," says Robert Strauss, professor of economics and public policy in the H. John Heinz III College.

Widespread publicity this week drove more than 800 hits to the site in one day, he adds.

Involving the community in identifying and monitoring the pothole problem is the primary goal of the project. The team also is considering other ways citizens may assist, including an adopt-a-pothole program that gets the community more involved with repairs.

"Kind of like a  pet rock," says Stauss.

"PennDOT found it interesting," he adds. "This new public database is a new tool people can use to monitor what road crews are doing and to judge the efficiency of government."

In other app news, Deeplocal's award-winning transit technology, RouteShout, was acquired by Atlanta-based RouteMatch Software Inc., developers of traveler information systems. Financial terms were not disclosed.

RouteShout, which marks the first sale of a Deeplocal asset, allows riders to access up-to-the-second transit arrival times from their mobile phones. It will provide the "missing link" of real-time arrival data needed for intelligent transit systems, says Tim Quinn of RouteMatch.

Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Robert Strauss, CMU; Deeplocal



Running late to a show? ParkPGH is the city's first smart parking app

Finding a last-minute parking spot on the night of a show just got easier with the region's first "smart" parking solution launched this week by The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust.

ParkPGH (that's Park P-G-H) is a tech-based strategy that gives users up-to-the-minute information on parking space availability in the Cultural District in one of five ways: iPhone app, mobile website, website, text messaging and a call-in phone service. Eight parking lots are participating and the remaining Cultural District garage, located at 9th and Penn Avenue, will be added in January 2011.

"I'm a regular attendee and it occurred to me that one of the big psychological impediments (to coming into the city for a show) is uncertainty about the parking," says Bill Benter, president of The Benter Foundation, who helped fund the project. "We're looking to make this a less stressful experience for all."

By January, ParkPGH.org will give patrons access to information on the more than 5,300 spaces in the Cultural District, which makes up 25% of all the parking in the city. The easy-to-use site  color-codes the garages in three ways: near capacity, approaching capacity or availability. If all goes well, the program will be expanded for citywide use.

The program was built by Deeplocal with assistance from the Pittsburgh Parking Authority, Alco Parking, Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership, Hillman Foundation and Numeritics. ParkPGH is designed to integrate with a larger project, Traffic21, a Carnegie Mellon initiative that is developing and deploying an intelligent transportation system that hopes to brand the region internationally as a place for "smart transportation."

"We want to make it available to the broadest possible audience," says Marc Fleming, vice president of marketing for The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust.

Writer: Deb Smit
Source: Marc Fleming, The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust; Bill Benter, The Benter Foundation

Image courtesy of The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust






Sprout Fund supports 20 new biodiversity projects with $190,000; PLSG on the move

Good news for the region's biodiversity and life sciences industry.

PLSG received $500,000 in funding that will help to establish a life sciences campus on the South Side at the River Park Commons Business Center.

The funding comes from a Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP) grant from the state. The new campus will provide space for four to six wet-labs in addition to the existing 9,000 square feet of life sciences labs. PLSG will also move its office to the campus.

"The demand for this campus is significant as an increasing number of new biotechnology companies are being launched throughout the nation, and geographic clusters to house these new, start-up companies are highly competitive," said John W. Manzetti, President and CEO.

In other news, 20 biodiversity projects received $190,000 this week as part of a new initiative to support the stewardship of Southwestern Pennsylvania's natural resources.

The Sprout Fund and The Pittsburgh Foundation hope to jumpstart community-based biodiversity projects in the region through the Spring Program. The funded projects were selected from among 75 applications, says Dustin Stiver of The Sprout Fund.

"These projects offer an exciting array of innovative solutions to the many environmental challenges we face," says Stiver. "With diverse objectives and creative approaches, they give promise that the biodiversity of our resource-rich region can be preserved and enhanced for generations to come."

Six biodiversity projects received $20,000 awards including:

BioShelter and Food Systems Center at the Garfield Community Farm, where a permanent bioshelter will extend the farm's growing season and offer educational opportunities to the nearby elementary school;

Green Roofs for Bus Shelters in East Liberty, introducing flora and fauna into the urban environment through a living green roof on Penn Avenue;

Heritage Seed Bank and Nursery for seed banks and educational opportunities in the preservation of native heritage or heirloom edible plants;

Native Appalachian Garden, part of Pittsburgh Botanical Garden, cultivating woodland species of the region;

And Take a Hike: Backyard Biodiversity for a traveling presentation that will lead elementary school children on an exploration of the Earth's biomes at the Carnegie Science Center.

The other 14 recipients receiving $5,000 awards are include outdoor classrooms for children, ecological gardens, artificial chimney habitats for neotropical migrant birds, rain gardens in schoolyards with the help of Nine Mile Run Watershed Assoc. and native plant restoration projects.

Writer: Deb Smit
Source: PLSG, Dustin Stiver, The Sprout Fund


The G-20 Summit offers the region tremendous job growth opportunities says Yablonsky

Welcoming the world to Pittsburgh for the G-20 Summit is a huge undertaking, but Dennis Yablonsky sees it more as a awesome opportunity.

"This is a major event and the fact that Pittsburgh was chosen is a real honor," says the CEO of the Allegheny Conference on Community Development. "This is a wonderful opportunity to increase the size of our pipeline for companies thinking of expansions. We think we'll end up with jobs and capital investments we might not have had otherwise."

The Allegheny Conference is one of four organizing partners of the G-20, The Pittsburgh G-20 Partnership, which includes Allegheny County, the city of Pittsburgh and VisitPittsburgh. The partnership's Web site is a central clearinghouse for information and online links, offering the latest news and an eNewsletter with volunteer opportunities for the G-20.

What does Yablonsky hope the region will take away from the G-20? With 2,000 journalists in the region, Pittsburgh has an unparalleled chance to tell the world that southwestern Pennsylvania has jobs, more than 25,000 through www.imaginemynewjob.com alone. We need to fill jobs locally and attract new talent.

"We need to get the word out," Yablonsky says. "We think there's a disconnect between the awareness and the reality here."

Will Pittsburgh be ready? Absolutely, says Yablonsky. "There's a tremendous number of smart people working on this."

What's the one thing he wishes that he could change before the G-20?

"The one thing Pittsburgh could use is more time to get everything done," he laughs. "We're working within a very compressed time frame. But there's nothing like a deadline to galvanize people."

Writer: Debra Diamond Smit

Source: Dennis Yablonsky, Allegheny Conference


Pittsburgh startup helps to solve the deadly problem of electrical cord fires

After several years of color-tuning, Pittsburgh startup HazardGuard Safety Wire has launched a unique consumer product that will help protect homes against the deadly problem of electrical cord fires.

An estimated 450 electrical fires occur every day and 800 deaths happen each year, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. The patented thermochromic polymer, which was invented by Fayette County coal miner John Ryeczek, attaches or wraps around household cords and turns from green to orange when a hot spike in temperature is detected.

The colored cords could help to eliminate hundred of deaths a year, says Walt Ogrodnik, CEO. "Even with so many wireless products out there, there's many electrical wires used today between gaming devices, space heaters, fans. There's quite a market for this."

HazardGuard developed the technology more than two years ago, but the initial design proved too expensive to make on a large scale. Ryeczek, who has spent eight years filing for product patents, redesigned the product as a clip or tie, substantially lowering the price and making it more affordable.

Called "Chameleon" clips and wraps, a set of six currently sells on the company's Web site for $6.99.

The company hopes to initially offer the product nationally through hardware stores. After that, Ogrodnik says it's onto big industry, which uses a more expensive thermal sensor system to do the job. There's really nothing affordable on the market for consumers or industrial use, he says.

Writer: Debra Diamond Smit

Source: Walt Ogrodnik, HazardGuard Safety Wire


Concierge medicine Medico Consulting ramps up for the G-20 and film business

Concierge medicine isn't new into the region, but Dr. Miki Fato of Medico believes that with film crews rolling in and the G-20 around the corner, a practice like hers couldn't be better positioned.

As a concierge physician, Fato is a personal, primary care physician on constant call. Boutique or concierge medicine, which first became popular in Seattle ten years ago, isn't for everyone. It's an alternative for busy executives on the go, families who want a high level of personal care and can afford to pay for it out of pocket, or for people passing through, such as film crews or visiting journalists.

That's Fato's niche.

"People don't realize how many visitors come to the Pittsburgh area for short periods of time, from cameramen to physicians to executives," she says. "There are a lot of individuals who are here for a time who may not really have a primary care physician. That's the service that I provide."

Concierge patients pay an out-of-pocket annual retainer for services, a fee that isn't covered by health insurance. In turn, they have round-the-clock access to a physician, can make same-day appointments and receive highly personal attention.

"Each Medico physician is limited to only 50 patients," says Fato. "It's like having your own personal physician, someone who knows you intimately who makes your health a priority. We are your guide as you navigate the healthcare system."

Fato spent 20 years working for the UPMC and West Penn health systems before founding Medico. She hopes to grow the company and hire more physicians in the coming years.

She most recently worked with several well-known actors on the set of Warrior, which finished filming here. "It's a niche I'm really interested in growing. The patient-doctor relationship is critical to the care of the patient. That's what inspired me to start Medico, providing the best medical care that I can provide."

Writer: Debra Diamond Smit

Source: Miki Fato, Medico


PNC's Virtual Student Wallet keeps spending and borrowing on track

Building on the popularity ofPNC's Virtual Wallet comes online banking for students and peace of mind for parents.

Virtual Wallet Student is a personal banking tool that helps students to manage their money, avoid costly mistakes and painful fees and—the best part—sends an alert email to family when funds are getting low. The solution was designed based on extensive research with students, parents and college administrators.

"It's unique in the banking world," says Mike Ley, vice president of payment and e-business. "This is a tool that will help students become better money managers."

PNC introduced Virtual Wallet a year ago, an innovative online program that was designed with Gen Yers in mind. The student version builds on PNC's successful model, with a spending tracker that categorizes where the money is going, such as restaurants, gas or shopping, a personalized calendar and email alerts or "danger days" for those times when funds get low.

The account is really three accounts in one. It's organized the way students think— spend, reserve and growth, says Ley.

Parents receive alerts via text message or e-mail when the account is close to zero or the balance goes below their pre-set threshold. Another handy feature sends digital receipts and messages via email to whomever owes the account holder money.

"Students are more interested in the here and now rather than a month overview," says Ley. "Parents like it because it allows them to see where the money is going."

To receive Pop City free each week, click here.

Writer: Debra Diamond Smit
Source: Mike Ley, PNC

Image courtesy PNC
329 Downtown & The Cultural District Articles | Page: | Show All
Share this page
0
Email
Print
Signup for Email Alerts