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First Bytes Society seeks tweens and teens for computer programming class

In 2012, the computer programming education initiative, First Bytes Society, won a $1,000 micro-grant from the Awesome Foundation.

“The grant from the Awesome Foundation served as the initial kick start for the First Bytes Society,” says First Bytes Society founder, Nate Good. “Their backing affirmed that this was a cause worthy of bringing to the community and helped us establish some important relationships in Pittsburgh.”

Now, after years of building partnerships, developing a curriculum, and creating a custom development environment, the Pittsburgh-based group is ready to launch its first pilot class.

The First Bytes Society Kick Off will provide a free eight-week course focused on teaching computer programming to 10 students between the ages of 12 and 15. The sessions will begin on March 30 and take place every following Monday at Union Project in East Liberty. Good hopes the pilot class will serve as a first step toward giving students the skills to succeed in today’s tech-heavy job market.

“In my anecdotal research among Pittsburgh students, it is very uncommon for students to even have the option to explore computer programming prior to late in their high school curriculum,” says Good. “This is especially true for public school districts serving communities with lower income families. Computer literacy has quickly become a crucial skill set for those entering the job market, regardless of their occupational focus."

First Bytes Society still has some work to do in the weeks leading up to the launch. The organization hopes to raise $3,500, either from corporate or individual donors, to round out funding for the class. For $250, donors can sponsor a laptop that will be used during the pilot class and future classes. Two local companies, ShowClix and Metamorphosis Spa in Lawrenceville, have already chosen to sponsor laptops.

Good is also in the process of recruiting more mentors to help with the classes. In addition to several software engineers that have signed on to teach, he hopes to attract individuals who possess backgrounds in computer science, or have experience working with teens.

While the pilot class centers on tweens and teens, First Bytes Society’s long-term mission is to teach programming to everyone, regardless of age. As the organization grows, Good plans to develop instruction for adults and young children.

“As we start to expand to older -- and younger -- demographics, we will introduce new curriculum tracks,” says Good. “The curriculum for tweens is focused around creating visuals and building interactive games. Curriculum for adults may be more oriented towards pragmatic real-world solutions, replacing the simple 2-D game with an interactive mortgage calculator.”

Those interested in registering a tween or teen for the First Bytes Society Kick Off can attend an info session taking place on March 2 at 7 p.m. at Union Project, or fill out an online application. Interested donors are encouraged to check out sponsorship opportunities on the website.

Pittsburgh joins urban goat grazing movement with Steel City Grazers

It's the year of the goat both in the Chinese zodiac and in Pittsburgh, where one small business has found a greener, more adorable way to handle lawn care.

Entrepreneur Carrie Pavlik recently launched an Indiegogo campaign for her venture Steel City Grazers. The service would provide goats to city residents who want a more eco-friendly alternative to gas-powered mowers and pesticides. The idea was launched after Pavlik, who runs a Hilltop-based urban hobby farm called Arlington Acres, received multiple requests from people wishing to use her two Nigerian Dwarf goats for landscaping. Interest in the practice was further piqued last summer when the urban forest initiative, Tree Pittsburgh, used 30 goats to clear West Penn Park in Polish Hill.

"I've had people come to me wanting the goats to eat poison ivy or knotweed in their yards," says Pavlik. "But the Tree Pittsburgh event definitely got the conversation started publicly and has created more excitement for the idea of grazing goats."

Steel City Grazers adds Pittsburgh to the list of cities taking part in this growing trend. The herd in Polish Hill came courtesy of the Annapolis, Md.-based business Eco-Goats, and metropolitan areas such as Detroit, San Francisco, and Portland have also recognized the advantages of urban goat grazing. Besides the environmental benefits, goats are also able to eat poisonous plants and scale terrain unreachable by conventional lawn equipment.

Pavlik hopes to raise enough start-up funds through the Indiegogo campaign to bring on 10 goats -- enough to clear one acre of land in three weeks -- as well as buy fencing, equipment and a guard llama. Once established, the herd can be rented for a base charge, a per-day charge, and other costs that depend on factors such as distance and accessibility.

With jobs lined up for the upcoming summer, Pavlik plans on beginning operations in May. From there, the goats will have a busy first season, followed by a much-needed vacation.

"They’ll get to kick back and relax over the winter, with the exception of an occasional party or event where a goat is requested," says Pavlik. "In the future, we may breed some of the goats to expand the herd as well."

Who's hiring in PGH? WPXI, Carlow University and more

Each week, Pop City scours the web to bring you exciting career opportunities in Pittsburgh. Employers, if you have a job opening or internship you would like to promote, please email innovationnews@popcitymedia.com with "Hiring" in the subject line. Hit us up on Twitter @popcitypgh if our job listings put you on the path to success.

WPXI-TV is seeking a motion graphic designer and graphic artist for their Marketing Department’s Creative Studio team. Responsibilities include conceptualizing, designing, animating and executing visual effect graphics. 

The station group that includes WESA and WYEP is hiring a director of development to manage annual individual giving and alternative revenue streams such as vehicle donations and corporate matches. Requirements include a Bachelor's or Master's degree and six years of relevant development and fundraising experience.

Automated Health Systems, Inc (AHS), a national health services management company headquartered in Pittsburgh, is hiring multiple positions, including a technical recruiter and IT coordinator.

Carlow University is looking for a full-time software applications support analyst and a full-time IR data analyst.

Highmark is hiring a senior decision support analyst (Job number 74340) to assist in the development of projects and data analysis. Candidates must have three years of experience in research, data analytics or statistical analysis.

Paid Internships

Giant Eagle has numerous paid internships available in the Pittsburgh area.

The civil engineering and architectural design firm Larson Design Group needs a summer site intern at their Cranberry Township offices. College juniors and seniors are welcome to apply.

Check out last week's listings for more opportunities.

To receive Pop City weekly, click here.

Web Design Day to showcase Pittsburgh talent

This summer, one conference will showcase the local web design and development community with a full lineup of speakers, workshops, and networking events.

Founded in 2009 as part of Refresh Pittsburgh, Web Design Day gathers individuals from Pittsburgh and beyond who work to make the web a better place. What started as a one-day local conference with around 100 people at Left Field Meeting Space has since grown into a two-day endeavor that attracts around 350 people and some of the biggest names in the industry. Even as the conference grows, however, it continues to provide a fun, intimate atmosphere where attendees can learn and network.

"We’ve heard awesome stories of people who have met their future bosses and colleagues at Web Design Day, a few folks who made career changes to web design, and even a speaker who moved back to Pittsburgh after getting to hang out with our awesome community," says G. Jason Head of Refresh Pittsburgh, who organizes Web Design Day with his wife and partner, Val Head.

Web Design Day will begin on June 11 with two full-day pre-conference workshops, one at Left Field Meeting Space on the North Shore and one at The Beauty Shoppe in East Liberty. The conference will take place on June 12 at the New Hazlett Theater in the North Side, where guests can enjoy plenty of activities, as well as an after-party that includes food, music, and hands-on screen printing of T-shirts and posters. The events also include a variety of speakers -- including Adaptive Web Design author Aaron Gustafson, brand and content strategist Margot Bloomstein, and many others -- who will offer their expertise and input on a variety of subjects.

"We put a lot of thought into carefully curating a well-balanced and diverse speaker lineup," says G. Jason Head. "We base our selections on what areas people are interested in, popular and relevant topics in our industry, speakers that we have seen and were impressed by, all focused around providing a day of relevant take-aways that will leave our attendees inspired."

New this year, Refresh Pittsburgh has developed a way to bring in community members who may not otherwise attend. The organization partnered with MailChimp, Think Through Math, and Girl Develop It Pittsburgh to provide 14 free scholarship tickets to students, low-income residents, and others unable to afford conference tickets, which range in cost from $215 to $499. As G. Jason Head explains, the free tickets are a way to ensure that Web Design Day includes people from a wide array of backgrounds.

"Diversity is important to us, and we feel a more diverse audience provides a better experience for everyone," says G. Jason Head. "We realize that the cost of attending industry conferences can be prohibitive for some people, and we want to do what we can to make it easier for someone to attend and have a good experience."

Visit the Web Design Day website to register for the conference. Those interested in applying for the scholarship tickets can do so on the Scholarship Program page.

Former Steeler partners with Pitt to launch new sports medicine company

When it comes to dealing with injuries, elite athletes have access to the best in rehabilitation technology. Now with the help of a retired football great, the University of Pittsburgh hopes to make the same grade of treatment available to the public.

Former Pittsburgh Steeler and businessman Charlie Batch, along with his three partners, joined with the University of Pittsburgh and its Innovation Institute to launch a wellness, fitness, human-performance, and rehabilitation-focused company. The Pittsburgh-based startup, called Impellia, will develop and commercialize technologies from Pitt and around the country.

To Evan Facher, director of enterprise development for the Innovation Institute, Batch's influence will help their commitment to improving public health and furthering the city's image as a hub for emerging technology and science.

"Because of the profile that he has and the good work that he's done, he can open a lot of doors for the company and the university as well," says Facher.

As part of the new relationship, Batch and the rest of the Impellia team -- which includes tech-savvy business professionals Richard Walker, Dave Morin, and Ed Kim -- completed option agreements for three distinct Pitt innovations. Physical therapists can help improve their patients' physical rehabilitation with the joint-function monitoring tool, interACTION. For knee injuries, there's PIVOT, a program that can quantitatively assess the pivot shift test, a clinical exam for diagnosing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. And the Versatile and Integrated System for Telerehabilitation (VISYTER) software platform provides a secure, integrated system that allows doctors to make diagnoses remotely with high-quality videoconferencing, access to electronic health records, and other tools.

"If you put all these things together, you have a company that can really do some novel rehabilitation and sports medicine," says Facher.

The inventions were edged toward commercialization by Pitt faculty members and the Innovation Institute, which is dedicated to promoting and fostering innovation, commercialization, and entrepreneurship. But as Facher explains, the process still requires an outsider like Impellia to come in and market the technology. To that end, he believes that Batch and his team bring a level of expertise that will help transform Pitt research into real innovations for years to come.

"In the past, they've taken university technologies and been successful at developing them," says Facher. "So it's a team that we believe in and would like to continue to do more with and build off of."

Who's hiring in PGH? Grow Pittsburgh, Point Park University and more

Each week, Pop City scours the web to bring you exciting career opportunities in Pittsburgh. Employers, if you have a job opening or internship you would like to promote, please email innovationnews@popcitymedia.com with "Hiring" in the subject line. Hit us up on Twitter @popcitypgh if our job listings put you on the path to success.

Management Science Associates (MSA) is hiring a UX researcher and a UX prototype developer to join the user-centered design team in their Information Management Solutions (IMS) division, which has been offering data and insight solutions to the consumer packaged goods industry since the early 1980s.

Niche, a local start-up that rates neighborhoods, schools and colleges, is hiring for multiple positions, including a front-end engineer and a senior software engineer.

Point Park University needs a full-time safety coordinator to oversee all Cinema Department productions. Candidate must have experience working on location production shoots, and have knowledge of cameras, lighting packages, grip and gaffing duties, and on-set safety procedures. Position requires a Bachelor of Arts or Master of Fine Arts in film production or related area.

Chatham University has an opening for a full-time Assistant Professor of English. Requires a doctorate in literature.

The Center for Theater Arts, a Mt. Lebanon-based nonprofit that offers professional performing arts classes to children and teens in the Pittsburgh area, is hiring a part-time director of development. Requirements include a Bachelor of Arts and five-plus years in development and fundraising.

Grow Pittsburgh is hiring a part-time site coordinator for its Garden Resource Center (GRC), a recently-opened tool lending library and materials depot. Candidates must possess some knowledge of organic gardening practices. Applications are due by March 2, 2015. 

The Children's Museum of Pittsburgh has two new part-time openings for an education programs specialist and early childhood program specialist.

Paid Internships

The Pittsburgh Steelers needs two marketing interns for the fall. 

The Allegheny Land Trust is looking for a Chartiers Creek Watershed intern for the summer. The deadline to apply is April 1, 2015.

Check out last week's listings for more opportunities.

To receive Pop City weekly, click here.

WindStax and Aquion Energy add more battery life to wind turbine systems

Two Pittsburgh companies prove that sometimes the best partners are the ones you find in your own back yard.

Strip District-based wind turbine manufacturer, WindStax, recently teamed up with Aquion Energy, a sustainable battery company located on 39th Street in nearby Lawrenceville. WindStax will integrate Aquion’s trademark Aqueous Hybrid Ion (AHI) batteries in their turbine microgrid systems, which will enable them to store more wind-generated energy.

While WindStax has already installed a dozen microgrid systems using traditional battery technologies, the Aquion partnership signals a move toward creating an overall cleaner energy source. Made with safe saltwater electrolyte and nontoxic materials, the AHI batteries are more eco-friendly than lead acid or lithium ion batteries, and produce a low carbon footprint throughout their lifespan, which, as WindStax founder and president Ronald Gdovic points out, could last for many years.

“Partnering with Aquion Energy allows us to offer our customers these environmental benefits while also greatly improving the performance and life of the batteries in our microgrid systems," says Gdovic. "In some cases we anticipate a five-fold increase in life -- possibly up to 20 years."

Founded in 2012, WindStax has worked to bring wind power to residential and commercial consumers by designing easy to use, self-contained systems. There's also the reliability factor, as their turbines are built to operate even in low wind conditions, while their generators are able to store up to several days worth of clean electricity.

Though WindStax is a young company, using Aquion demonstrates their foresight in preparing to grow and change with the industry.

"We recognized long ago that the next big thing in electricity generation will be improvements in battery technology," says Gdovic. "So we designed our turbines to charge a number of different batteries. For us, adding the Aquion battery option only took a small change in the charging profile -- an easy integration."

The first WindStax/Aquion microgrid system will debut in Braddock this March. WindStax is also offering the AHI battery as an option to current customers who wish to upgrade.

Who's hiring in PGH? Astrobotic, Qeexo and more

Each week, Pop City scours the web to bring you fulfilling career opportunities in Pittsburgh. Employers, if you have a job opening or internship you would like to promote, please email innovationnews@popcitymedia.com with "Hiring" in the subject line. Hit us up on Twitter @popcitypgh if our job listings put you on the path to success.

Astrobotic, a space logistics company specializing in affordable commercial space robotics technology, is hiring multiple positions, including a director of marketing and communications, a senior software engineer, and an avionics engineer.

Astrobotic recently accepted a third Milestone Prize from the Google Lunar XPRIZE competition. The $1 million victory, in addition to two previous wins, brings the secured prize money total to $1.75 million.

“These three Milestones are big for us,” says Astrobotic CEO John Thornton. “It’s acknowledgement of a lot of tough work.”

Based in the Strip District, Astrobotic formed in 2008 shortly after the XPRIZE competition was announced. Since then, the company has competed with five other teams by showing off various components of their commercial robotic lunar rover.

The recent achievement brings Astrobotic closer to its goal of sending a robotic rover to the moon in 2016.

Community-based organization Larimer Consensus Group is seeking a neighborhood improvement specialist. Requirements include a valid driver’s license, access to a vehicle, and the ability to work occasional evenings and weekends. Please send current resume and up to three professional references to the Larimer Consensus Group Hiring Committee at mmaeda@kingsleyassociation.org.

PennFuture, a statewide public interest membership organization, is hiring a full-time director of outreach. The qualified candidate will manage PennFuture's issue campaigns, organize coalition efforts, and maintain relationships with policymakers, members of the organization, and the public. PennFuture is also looking for a donor relations intern.

Qeexo, a company that specializes in touchscreen technology, is hiring multiple positions, including a project manager and a software engineer, for its Pittsburgh office.

Mobile commerce platform Branding Brand is hiring for multiple positions, including a communications and events coordinator, a project manager, and a software engineer/web developer.

Dick's Sporting Goods is hiring an assistant graphics designer to work on the development of packaging, collateral and product branding. Requires a B.A. in graphic design and four years of design experience.

Pittsburgh Bike Share, a nonprofit citywide bike sharing system, needs a director of operations and a director of marketing and community relations.  

Check out last week's listings for more opportunities.

To receive Pop City weekly, click here.
 

Solarize to kick off Allegheny program in Point Breeze

Pittsburgh residents interested in converting to solar power can now turn to a new program for help. On Feb. 8, Solarize Allegheny, a community-supported solar campaign, officially kicked off in Point Breeze with a celebration at Pino’s Restaurant on Feb. 8. That event, along with a workshop taking place at the St. Bede School on Feb. 11, launches a 20-week long project to bring solar energy to the neighborhood.

The program, which is called Solarize Point Breeze, was made possible through a partnership between the Point Breeze Organization and Solarize creator, SmartPower, a national nonprofit dedicated to increasing the adoption of solar technology in participating communities across the country. Solarize Point Breeze also marks the first phase of a plan to expand and double the number of solar installations in Allegheny County over the next two years.

“Solarize campaigns are successful because we tap into the social networks and interest in clean energy that already exists in the community,” says SmartPower Vice President Sharon Pillar. “The Point Breeze Organization is leading the Solarize Point Breeze effort and connecting the campaign to their contacts and in turn, the effect ripples throughout the community. “

As Pillar explains, Solarize Allegheny will provide residents with solar information and resources by engaging them where they live, work and worship. Those interested in adopting solar power are then connected directly to local, pre-screened, qualified solar installers who will offer competitive bids. With the help of the Pittsburgh Urban Redevelopment  Authority, the program will also find financial assistance, such as zero down or zero interest loans, for qualifying homeowners.

Solarize has already proven successful in other states, including Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Vermont and Arizona, where each community campaign spawned an average of 30 to 40 installations. The most successful two-year program, Solarize Connecticut, covered 52 communities and converted more than 1,900 homeowners, which constitutes one-third of all the residential solar power in the state.

“Solarize is so successful because it taps into a rapidly exploding interest for people to produce their own energy, to save money on their electric bills and to help the environment,” says Pillar.

Besides Point Breeze, Solarize Allegheny will also branch out into Moon Township, South Fayette Township, and the Etna and Millvale boroughs. The next phase will begin in late spring when the program selects and launches in another four or five local communities.

Those interested in learning more about Solarize Allegheny can register for the Solarize Point Breeze launch party or the Solarize Point Breeze workshop through Eventbrite.
 

Local industry leaders needed for EY Entrepreneur Of The Year awards

EY, a global leader in assurance, tax, transaction and advisory services, has officially requested nominations from western Pennsylvania and West Virginia for the 29th annual EY Entrepreneur Of The Year awards. The program seeks the world’s most innovative entrepreneurs and celebrates their ability to strengthen or transform successful enterprises.

"The unique award makes a difference through the way it encourages entrepreneurial activity among those with potential, and recognizes the contribution of people who inspire others with their vision, leadership and achievement," says Kim Gillespie, who, along with Darrel Smalley, serves as co-director of the western Pennsylvania and West Virginia awards program.

Award winners are selected in a number of industry categories, including Distribution and Manufacturing, Energy, Family Business, Financial Services, Construction, Retail and Consumer Products, Services, and Technology, by a panel of independent regional judges. Contestants are evaluated on areas such as entrepreneurial spirit, the ability to overcome obstacles, financial performance and growth, innovation and new approaches, company culture, leadership, and impact in the community.

The winners will be announced at a black-tie gala on June 19, 2015, at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. They will then go on to compete at the national EY Entrepreneur Of the Year awards taking place in Palm Springs, Calif., this coming November.

In 2014, more than 25 western Pennsylvania and West Virginia leaders were selected as EY Entrepreneur Of The Year award finalists. Past local award winners include Rob Daley and Henry Thorne of the baby product company 4moms and Laura Shapira Karet of the grocery store chain Giant Eagle.

"We are inspired every year by the countless entrepreneurs in western Pennsylvania and West Virginia who are driving growth, creating jobs and making a positive impact on our communities," says Gillespie.

The deadline to apply for the EY Entrepreneur Of The Year Awards is March 6, 2015. Entrepreneurs may nominate themselves or be nominated by peers or other business leaders.  

Astrobotic and CMU work toward moon landing with Google Lunar XPRIZE

A trip to the moon isn’t cheap, but thanks to some generous prize money, one local company is another step closer to getting there.

Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and Astrobotic, a space logistics company specializing in affordable commercial space robotics technology, recently accepted a third Milestone Prize from the Google Lunar XPRIZE competition. The $1 million victory, in addition to two previous wins, brings the secured prize money total to $1.75 million. It also makes Astrobotic and CMU the first team to win all three Milestone prizes.

“These three Milestones are big for us,” says Astrobotic CEO John Thornton. “It’s acknowledgement of a lot of tough work.”

Based in the Strip District, Astrobotic formed in 2008 shortly after the XPRIZE competition was announced. Since then, the company has competed with five other teams by showing off various components of their commercial robotic lunar rover. The third Milestone Prize came after they demonstrated their visually guided lunar landing system, which underwent numerous tests last year at the Mojave Air and Space Port. The system -- which Thornton refers to as an “astronaut in a box” -- uses imaging software to ensure safer, more precise touchdowns and dramatically reduce the risk of crashes.

Astrobotic also received recognition for the lander’s “green” propulsion system. As Thornton explains, their propellant poses far fewer risks than the traditionally used hydrazine propellant, a quality that allows for more on-the-ground testing.

“If [hydrazine propellant] is spilled into the air, it could kill you on a parts per million level,” says Thornton. “Whereas the propellant that we use is still toxic, but much less so, which makes it easier to test terrestrially.”

The recent achievement brings Astrobotic and CMU closer to their goal of sending a robotic rover to the moon in 2016. The team will also go on to compete for the $20 million grand XPRIZE, as well as bonus prizes.

If they win, Thornton hopes to reinvest the money in Astrobotic’s commercial operation, a sort of “FedEx or UPS to the moon” that delivers lunar payloads for companies, governments, universities, nonprofits and individuals. While the funds would add to millions in NASA grants and contracts that the company has already received, it still compensates for a portion of the amount required to create and run the service.

“The prize money is fairly small compared to the cost to get there, so it’s not a money-making proposition,” says Thornton. “The goal is to build the business, so if we were to win the prize, we would put that right back into the company to support the commercial operation of the business."

Pitt ensures healthier organ transplants with new preservation system

A successful organ transplant requires a delicate balance of time and preservation. But as UPMC transplant surgeon Dr. Paulo Fontes points out, 21 percent of donor livers are rendered unusable due to oxygen deprivation during storage and damage sustained during transport.

“The current utilization of livers in our country is much lower than expected, and we still face a significant mortality on the waiting list due to our inability to properly serve our patients with organs being effectively preserved,” says Fontes.

Fontes is the senior investigator on a series of animal studies at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, where researchers are setting out to prove the effectiveness of a new machine-perfusion (MP) organ preservation system. The system was developed by optimizing an existing MP device with a chilled, oxygen-rich fluid. The liver is immersed in the fluid, which further oxygenates the tissue by being pumped through the organ via tubes inserted into the large blood vessels.

Tests conducted on pigs suggest that the MP system can keep donor livers in better condition than current methods. The research team transplanted six pigs with livers that had been kept for nine hours -- roughly the average time between recovering the organ and transplantation -- in the MP system, and another six pigs with organs that were treated with conventional cold static preservation (CSP). Overall, 100 percent of the pigs who received MP livers survived, compared to 33 percent with the CSP-treated organs. Researchers also noticed that the MP pigs recovered more quickly from surgery, and looked healthier than their CSP counterparts.

“Cold preservation is the current standard of care for clinical transplantation, but unfortunately has no impact in avoiding or minimizing the irreversible decay of organ quality inflicted over time when tissues are kept under hypothermic and anoxic conditions,” says Fontes. “Recovery time for livers submitted to CSP appears to be longer than the ones preserved with machine perfusion due to the significant impact of the injuries induced by CSP.”

The findings, which were published online in the American Journal of Transplantation, suggest that the MP system could potentially increase the number of healthy donor livers and save more lives. Data from the studies has been shared with federal regulators in hopes of launching a clinical trial with transplant patients at UPMC later this year.

Who's hiring in PGH? YMCA of Greater Pittsburgh, Warhol Museum and more

More snow means more time indoors, which means more time to devote to your latest job search. Each week, Pop City scours the web to bring you exciting career opportunities in Pittsburgh. Employers, if you have a job opening or internship you would like to promote, please email innovationnews@popcitymedia.com with "Hiring" in the subject line. Hit us up on Twitter @popcitypgh if our job listings put you on the path to success.
 
The Carnegie Museum of Art is hiring a curator of photography to serve as head of the photography department. Qualified candidate will be responsible for the presentation, loan, and development of the museum’s collection of photographs, comprising more than 4,500 works acquired since the 1970s. Requirements include an M.A. or Ph.D. in the history of photography, art history or other relevant field.

The RAND Corporation is looking for an interactive multimedia designer (Job ID: 3952). Responsibilities include recording, editing, and encoding audio and video products. Other duties include interactive web work, such as front-end development of web applications, media players, and data visualization tools.
 
The Warhol Museum is hiring a full-time director of exhibitions to oversee the management and direction of all exhibition galleries.
 
The Phipps Conservatory has multiple positions available, including openings for a volunteer coordinator and a science education research manager. They’re also seeking interns for their community-focused Homegrown program, as well as their summer Horticulture and Discovery education programs.
 
The YMCA of Greater Pittsburgh is seeking a director of information technology. Interested candidates must have a B.S. or B.A. and a minimum of 15 years of related information technology experience. Please send resumes to itjobs@ymcapgh.org.
 
The Hilltop Alliance, a nonprofit community development organization committed to preserving and creating community assets in Pittsburgh’s Hilltop neighborhoods, is hiring a full-time project manager. The application deadline is Feb. 20, 2015.
 
Check out last week's listings for more opportunities.

Dynamics protects credit card information with innovative security features

In 2014, data breaches at major retailers such as Target, Home Depot and Neiman Marcus compromised credit card information belonging to millions of customers. As companies work to prevent future attacks, one local innovator has partnered with MasterCard to help protect cardholders from being victimized no matter where they shop.

Cheswick-based Dynamics Inc. specializes in designing and manufacturing intelligent battery-powered payment devices and advanced payment platforms. Recently, the company -- which was founded in 2007 by Carnegie Mellon University graduate Jeff Mullen -- introduced security-enhanced interactive payment cards to global MasterCard customers at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The card technology is the first of its kind to offer data protection through three interactive functionalities.

Flor Estevez, a leader of Worldwide Communications at MasterCard, believes there are multiple advantages that come with the Dynamics card.

"Dynamics is at the forefront of interactive payment card manufacturing, and their technology has both functional benefits, like adding an extra layer of security, and strategic benefits, like helping consumers understand the benefits of using an electronic device for payments," Estevez said.

The Dynamics interactive features include an unlock function that enables customers to turn cards on or off with secret pass codes, which prevents lost or stolen cards from being used. The card also offers two distinct dynamic code generators that safeguard each in-store or online purchase with random security codes. These unique codes ensure that a cardholder's account data will stay protected even in the event of a merchant breech.

In addition to its security features, the Dynamics card design boasts a thin computer circuit board enclosed within the plastic, as well as customizable buttons, displays and LEDs. Dynamics also pairs its interactive card technology with mobile applications for consumers to better manage their accounts in real time.

MasterCard is currently working with a number of issuers in the United States and worldwide to bring Dynamics technology to the market. Issuers will then determine whether the extra security features will come at an additional cost.

Who's hiring in PGH? Venture Outdoors, Allegheny CleanWays and more

Each week, Pop City scours the web to bring you exciting job opportunities in Pittsburgh. Employers, if you have a career opportunity you would like to promote, please email innovationnews@popcitymedia.com with "Hiring" in the subject line. Hit us up on Twitter @popcitypgh if our job listings put you on the path to success.

The Allegheny County Parks Department is hiring a senior park ranger. Duties include training newly hired park rangers and providing customer service to county parks visitors. Requires current first aid and CPR certification and a valid Class C driver's license.

Community Care Behavioral Health is hiring a full-time web operations analyst to maintain and update the organization's website and secure web portal.

The Neighborhood Learning Alliance is hiring part-time high school tutors to provide instruction on a variety of subjects.

4moms, a company that develops innovative juvenile products, is hiring a full-time international marketing manager and a full-time eCommerce manager

Daedalus, an established Pittsburgh consulting firm, is looking for a software engineer to join the team. Must have experience in embedded software development for micro-controllers in C and C++, knowledge of app development for both iOS and Android, and familiarity with PC, Linux, and web development. The firm is also looking for a business development manager and sales representative.

The Innovation Works/CMU/Alpha Lab Gear robotics startup BistroBot needs a full-time entry-level mechanical engineer and a full-time senior mechanical engineer. Both positions require degrees in mechanical engineering or a related field, and experience in designing, building and testing robots or mechatronic systems. BistroBot also has an available software engineering internship. Please send all application materials to jobs@bistrobot.com.

Venture Outdoors, a nonprofit that promotes outdoor recreation, is hiring for multiple positions, including a youth program coordinator and a program administrator.

Allegheny CleanWays, a nonprofit organization committed to to eliminating illegal dumping and littering in Allegheny County, is hiring a full-time programs director. Applications materials must be received by Feb. 11, 2015.

Check out last week's listings for more opportunities.
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