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Civic Impact

Family moves into Habitat for Humanity home after years in refugee camp




Originally from Burundi, new homeowners Beuline Ndikumana and Issa Ntamagendro were displaced by civil war in 1972 and forced into a refugee camp where their five children were born. After moving to America in 2008, they partnered with Habitat for Humanity to escape living in an overcrowded, public housing project. Now, after investing more than 350 hours of "sweat equity" work on their home as a down payment, the family will finally have a place to call their own.

The family received the keys to their home in a dedication ceremony held on Sat., May 17 where they signed papers for an interest free mortgage which will include escrow for homeowner’s insurance, municipal, county and school taxes. Their monthly payments will be less than $600. 

In 2011, Habitat acquired the property from a real estate agent who was aware of the organization’s search for a home large enough to fit the family.  

“A Howard Hanna realtor familiar with our program knew we were looking for an affordable home that would house 6 persons and that we love putting families into Sharpsburg and the Fox Chapel School District,” says Maggie Withrow, executive director for Habitat for Humanity Greater Pittsburgh. “The realtor had a house for sale in Sharpsburg that we evaluated and determined that a $50,000 purchase price to Habitat would ultimately be affordable to the family once we did a complete rehab.”

As part of their agreement with Habitat Pittsburgh to receive the house, Ndikumana and Ntamagendro helped work on repairs to the home. The organization allows homeowners to invest a minimum of 350 hours of sweat equity in place of a traditional down payment. This equity can be earned by working on their own home, the homes of others or by working in the ReStore retail outlet in Edgewood.

“Most low-income families do not have, and can likely never save, the cash down payment for a house,” says Withrow. “For traditional down payments, banks could require 10-25% of the cost of the house. For example, for a $90,000 house, a family would have to save a minimum of $9,000 which is totally out of reach.”

Although Ndikumana and Ntamagendro committed many hours to repairing their home, they certainly weren’t alone in the effort. More than 800 volunteers helped with repairs and updates that included converting an upstairs apartment kitchen into a bedroom, renovating all bathrooms, replacing windows, installing a new kitchen, new drywall, new molding, and reconfiguring walls. The house also needed a new furnace and new electrical work.

“It’s the largest house Habitat Pittsburgh has remodeled and it took us just over two years to complete,” says Withrow.

The project was made possible through the aid of several organizations. The Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh provided volunteers from more than 15 congregations. Funds from the Fox Chapel Area School District’s annual telethon were also used to complete much needed weatherization work on the 124-year-old home. Additional supporters include Dollar Bank, Excela Health, General Motors, KDA Company, the Pittsburgh Association of Petroleum Geologists (PAPG), and Travelers Insurance, who helped rehabilitate this house through their financial sponsorship and volunteer labor. Volunteer groups from the Knights of Columbus, Newlonsburg Presbyterian Church, Nexus Real Estate, NAIOP, the Pittsburgh Pirates, and local universities also worked closely alongside the family in rehabilitating the home.

For more information about Habitat for Humanity Greater Pittsburgh visit www.pittsburghhabitat.org.

Source: Maggie Withrow, Habitat for Humanity Greater Pittsburgh
Photos from Habitat for Humanity Greater Pittsburgh and Ken Eber
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