| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter RSS Feed

Development News

2124 Articles | Page: | Show All

Eat + Drink: Fish, fireplaces, macarons by mail

Eat + Drink is Pop City’s weekly look at epic local nommz.

Toro Fest 2013
Bloomfield’s Fukuda, which celebrated its first anniversary in October, is hosting its first annual Toro Fest this week, with a full calendar of events scheduled through next Monday. Named for the Japanese term for fatty Bluefin tuna, Toro Fest isn’t just a celebration of the food itself, but of fish and sustainability on the whole.

Throughout the week, Fukuda will offer sessions on Japanese culture and language at the restaurant, and end the week by taking over No Menu Monday at Bar Marco on December 16th.

For more information, check out Fukuda’s Toro Fest calendar or the event’s Facebook page.
 
Macarons by mail
Gaby et Jules, the French patisserie on Forbes Avenue in Squirrel Hill which started this year as a joint venture between Paris 66 owners Fred and Lori Rongier and Master Pastry Chef David Piquard, has opened up an online store and begun taking orders for its deservedly celebrated macarons.

In addition to its normal range of flavors, Piquard has rolled out a holiday line which includes gingerbread, peppermint white chocolate, Orangette (chocolate and orange, Eat + Drink’s favorite), chestnut and egg nog — a flavor Piquard was initially skeptical of, but which was made at Lori Rongier’s urging and much to our delight.

To ensure the macarons arrive fresh, Gaby et Jules ships only Monday through Wednesday and utilizes USPS Priority Mail.
 
Get inside, get warm
Today’s high is under 30°. Tomorrow’s is under 20°. But are you really going to let that keep you from enjoying your weeknight happy hour? Consider joints with fireplaces:

For drinks, stop by 1947 Tavern on Ellsworth Avenue in Shadyside. Monterey Pub in the North Side’s Mexican War Streets district is another cozy option. A few blocks away, Max’s Allegheny Tavern offers German fare by an old fireplace. Toast! offers excellent food and great wine in a beautiful old building in Shadyside which has fireplaces on all three stories. Eat + Drink’s favorite, though, is The Oak Room — the hotel bar inside the Mansions on Fifth. It’s seldom crowded unless there’s an event, and it’s easily one of the five coziest rooms in the city.

Writer: Matthew Wein

An artist and an antique dealer form one of the Strip District's coolest shared spaces

Michael Lotenero was an artist looking for workspace. John and Marla Zerrer were antique dealers with a little more space than they needed.

“These guys were looking to rent the space out to other antique dealers, and I just walked in one day and asked if they’d be willing to rent it out for one artist to use as a studio,” Lotenero says.

That’s how the front half of Zerrer’s Antiques, located at 2703 Penn Avenue in the Strip District, became the headquarters for Lotenero Art + Design. And why not?

Lotenero and the Zerrers will celebrate one year together with an open house tomorrow from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m., showcasing both businesses’ finest in art and antiques, respectively.

The building, which in 1890 housed the upscale Hays Hotel & Saloon, sports unfinished bare brick walls and an ornate ceiling of pressed tin — all frozen in a state of decay that’s warm, interesting and oddly suited to its joint purposes.

Because it’s situated in an area of the Strip that’s closer to Lower Lawrenceville than it is to the food markets, the block hasn’t seen much foot traffic since the Zerrers moved in about five years ago, but that’s changing with the relocation of the Pittsburgh Public Market.

“I’ve noticed a lot more foot traffic on the block,” says John Zerrer. “You see some, but usually it’s people going to check out the warehouse with the Steelers jerseys. But the week the market opened, we had people who stopped in on their way to or from the market who said they had no idea we were here.”

The partnership has benefitted both businesses. Zerrer’s dedicated clientele, some of whom do prop work for movies, have inquired about using Lotenero’s art. People who specifically seek out Lotenero’s work find themselves in a room full of eclectic antiques, rethinking the way they want to decorate.

“I’m here almost every day. It’s an open studio. I wanted to be exposed to people walking in and being around,” Lotenero says. “It’s a weird experiment. I get to rifle through some weird, old things.”

Writer: Matthew Wein
Sources: Michael Lotenero, John Zerrer

Pittsburgh-based eyewear company gets serious about charity

To any Pittsburgh outsider, the fact that Penn Avenue Eyewear isn’t located anywhere near Penn Avenue might make about as much sense as the Port Authority’s bus numbering system, or how streets here have a funny way of casually turning into staircases.

But even most Pittsburghers would be at a loss to explain why a company called Penn Avenue Eyewear would be located on the North Side. The fledgling online retailer of locally designed glasses frames started out as an optical lab on Penn in the Strip District, but recently moved its operation after establishing a large retail presence online.

“We officially launched in May. We’re really just starting out,” says Caitlin Northup, the company’s creative director.
While the company has quickly gained traction as an online retailer, Northup thinks its new charity initiative could help put the company on more Pittsburghers’ maps. Last week, Pen Avenue Eyewear began allowing customers to choose a charity to receive 10 percent of each purchase.

“We’ve been giving to charity and doing some special events. We got to thinking about it more and we wanted to put the choice in our customers’ hands,” Northup says.

Currently, the list includes seven local and national charities, but Northup says she hopes that list will grow with customer input.

“The more the merrier at this point,” she says. “I’d love to get to the point where we have so many charities that people can search them by name or location or anything. I want to completely open it up so people can find something which means something to them.”

Writer: Matthew Wein
Source: Caitlin Northup

Kevin Sousa to open farm-to-table restaurant in Braddock

If all goes according to plan, Chef Kevin Sousa could bring a game-changing installation to Braddock. But first, he needs the funding.

Sousa, whose restaurants include Salt of the Earth, Union Pig & Chicken and Station Street Hot Dogs, has launched a Kickstarter campaign to help raise the funds necessary to build Superior Motors a hyper-local restaurant from top to bottom, and just one part of what he sees as a local ecosystem capable of stimulating Braddock's economy.

"We don't have a lot of capital right now. The banks are not, at this time, willing to come to Braddock or take that risk," Sousa says. "We're really going for it. We feel like we've really put together a great campaign."

Superior Motors will occupy the space at 1121 Braddock Avenue in a structure which dates to 1921 and was one of the first indoor car dealerships in the country, known for a time as you guessed it Superior Motors. It's directly across from the Edgar Thompson Steel Works, which Sousa says provides a "malignant beauty."

The restaurant will get about 85 percent of its ingredients from within a two-block radius. In addition to utilizing Braddock Farms and the Braddock Apiary just down the street, Superior Motors will sport a 1,000 square-foot greenhouse on its roof, plus an additional 4,000 square feet of on-site, raised-bed gardens. Next door, the Braddock Hostel will provide no-cost housing for the restaurant's staff of culinary and service interns from across the country.

"There will be significant discounts for everyone who lives in Braddock," he says. "It won't be a matter of income. Everyone who wants to eat here will be able to afford this restaurant."

Additionally, Sousa is working with the Braddock Youth Project to offer the area's young people opportunities to develop practical skills in the food and farming trades.

"The goal is to provide more than just summer classes," he says. "We're working on a whole sustainable curriculum."
Sousa projects Superior Motors will be ready to open in early 2015.

Writer: Matthew Wein
Source: Kevin Sousa

Eat + Drink: Kelly's new hours, an unusual seasonal beer and more

Eat + Drink is Pop City’s weekly look at epic local nomz.

Kelly’s offering lunch service
Kelly’s, the decades-old East Liberty happy hour-mainstay, is known for its cocktails, ambience and baked mac & cheese. Now, after years of catering exclusively to Pittsburgh’s nightlife, the bar and lounge has expanded its hours and is open daily at 11:30 a.m., offering full lunch service.

“We have the same menu all day long, but we’ll be running daily lunch specials as well,” says Kelly’s general manager Deirdre Durant, adding that the specials will feature pot pies made from scratch which will change week-to-week, and sandwiches, including a lamb burger with pickled red onions.

Lunch isn’t an isolated incident, either. The bar will remain open until its usual 2 a.m. daily closing with happy hour running unchanged from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

An unexpected seasonal beer
Many beer drinkers tend to prefer hoppy beers during periods of warmer weather. But as he’s wont to do with just about everything, Roundabout Brewery’s Steve Sloan has created another stellar hybrid beer which bends convention.  

Called New Zealand Summer Winter Warmer, it combines an English-style winter warmer — a strong ale with heavy and sweet malt flavors — with a generous but not overwhelming amount of New Zealand hops. After all, our winter is their summer.

The result is a balanced, seasonal ale which is likely to satiate both malt fans and hopheads — something previously not thought possible.
 
Prohibition dinner at Tender
Eighty years ago tomorrow, the United States ratified the 21st Amendment to the Constitution, repealing Prohibition. To commemorate the occasion, Tender Bar + Kitchen is celebrating with a Repeal Day dinner featuring spirits from Laird & Company, America’s oldest commercial distillery.

Tickets for the event are $65 and include a four-course meal and cocktail reception with Lisa Laird, the distillery’s ninth-generation owner. For more information or to buy tickets, check out the event page.

Writer: Matthew Wein
Source: Deirdre Durant

ACTION Housing to redevelop long-vacant Squirrel Hill property

After sitting vacant for nearly a decade, the space that formerly housed Poli restaurant in Squirrel Hill has been acquired by ACTION-Housing and will be redeveloped into a mix of residential and office units.

After more than a year of effort, ACTION acquired the property at 5685 Forward Avenue through a sheriff’s sale in September. It will partner with Jewish Residential Services to convert the site into a multi-purpose facility after demolishing the existing structure.

“We’d build up four or five stories,” says Linda Metropulos, ACTION-Housing’s director of housing and neighborhood development. “We’d build the building as a condo, and JRS would have the ground floor. We’d have the residential space above.”

Metropulos adds that JRS would likely use its portion of the space to build out its offices and improve the Howard Levin Clubhouse — a non-profit facility assisting people affected by mental illness — which currently sits in the space adjacent to the former restaurant.

She also says that while plans are very premature, the project will cost somewhere between $12 and $15 million to complete. Though ACTION hasn’t formally enlisted an architecture firm, Metropulos said it is doing preliminary consultations with Downtown-based FortyEighty Architecture.

“We’d probably start construction at the end of 2015,” Metropulos says. “It’s a lengthy process.”

Writer: Matthew Wein
Source: Linda Metropulos

Giant Eagle looks to open grocery store Downtown

On the heels of developer Ralph Falbo’s plan to open a boutique food market and wine bar in Market Square, Giant Eagle is exploring the notion of opening a full-service grocery somewhere in Downtown Pittsburgh.

While Giant Eagle hasn’t yet chosen a site for a Downtown location, there are several it is considering.

“We have been collaborating with Giant Eagle on a feasibility study to see if Downtown is a location that would be suitable for them, and the indicators are positive,” says Leigh White of the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership. “They’re looking at a number of sites but haven’t settled on anything.”

Downtown Pittsburgh hasn’t had a full-service grocery store since Rosebud Fine Food Market and Deli, which was located at the corner of Seventh Street and Fort Duquesne Boulevard, closed in 2010 after just two years of operation. Prior to Rosebud, Downtown’s last grocery store was The Market on Market Square, which occupied the former G.C. Murphy building on Forbes Avenue and closed its doors in 1994.

Demand for a grocery store in Downtown Pittsburgh has steadily grown over the last several years as the area’s residential population has increased. According to a report the PDP released earlier this year, about 8,000 people live in the Greater Downtown area. The same report stated that in answering an open-ended question about retail needed in Downtown, 33 percent of residents identified a grocery store as their top priority.

Writer: Matthew Wein
Source: Leigh White

Award-winning Holiday Market returns, bigger and better

The Peoples Gas Holiday Market, which earlier this year won a Merit Award from the International Downtown Association, is back up and running in Downtown Pittsburgh’s Market Square.

“Last year, we had 12 to 15 vendors. This year, we have more than 25,” says Leigh White of the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership. “We have six vendors who came in from overseas and from across the country.”

This year’s market boasts vendors selling holiday goods from Eastern European cultures familiar to Pittsburgh, all the way to special items from Ireland and Nepal. There’s a large tent offering traditional, handmade German decorations, a selection of trees and wreaths of various sizes and plenty to eat.

White added that in addition to adding some more international flavor to this year’s edition — which has turned Market Square into a miniature holiday village — the market has added some Pittsburgh-specific retailers to its repertoire.

Drew and Jeannine Hine’s South Side-based Vessel Studio Glass had a booth part-time at last year’s market, but is back again this year, occupying a full-time space, where they’re offering everything from intricately designed cheese knives to hand-blown tree ornaments —including a mock-up of the much-beloved rubber duck which spent three weeks in Pittsburgh waters earlier this year.

“We’re making more every night just to keep up with demand,” Jeannine Hine says.

White says the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership is expecting more than 250,000 visitors to the holiday market, and that it anticipates a very positive effect on the Downtown economy. Last year, for every $100 consumers spent in the market, they spent an additional $500 in Downtown’s other businesses and restaurants.

“One of the biggest reasons we do this is that we want people to come Downtown and shop here, but also shop at the other stores and restaurants, and we’re really seeing the effects of that,” White says.

For a complete list of the market's vendors and operating hours, visit its website.

Writer: Matthew Wein
Source: Leigh White

Eat + Drink: A heavy dose of holiday spirits and more

Eat + Drink is Pop City's weekly look at epic local nomz.

Larkin leads the way on Allegheny River Libation Trail
It seems that craft breweries, distilleries and wineries just recently started popping up in Pittsburgh.

Well don’t look now, but there are 15 such independent producers along the Allegheny River corridor alone. That’s why Bill Larkin, who with his wife, Michelle, owns and operates Arsenal Cider House in Lawrenceville, is leading the charge in establishing the Allegheny River Libation Trail.

“I pulled everybody together from a certain geographical area and we just had a meeting,” Larkin said. “I think it’s remarkable that there are so many producers in such a small area. I think it’s something that should be exploited.”

The coalition’s first order of business will be to produce a brochure, highlighting all of its members and their proximity to one another. Larkin says that since a lot of the producers already support each other— many order their ingredients together in bulk to save on shipping costs — so this kind of cross-promotion makes sense.

Of the 15 breweries, distilleries and wineries in the neighborhoods along both sides of the Allegheny — from Millvale and Lawrenceville, all the way up through the Strip District and the North Side — 13 intend to participate in what Larkin views as a loose confederation of businesses.

“I don’t think anybody wants to make this an official organization,” he says. “We’re all pretty busy, and I don’t think anyone wants that kind of commitment.”
 
Stay Tuned Distillery opens in Munhall
One distillery you won’t find on the libation trail, simply by virtue of its location, is the Stay Tuned Distillery, which opened earlier this month.

Located at 810 Ravine Street in Munhall, Stay Tuned specializes in finishing whisky and gin made from spirits distilled at the Copper Fox Distillery in Sperryville, Virginia. The local operation houses their rectification facilities, a retail shop and a tasting bar.

“We finish their rye and their single malt, and we make our own gin,” says co-owner LeeAnn Sommerfeld.

Though not yet available for sale, Stay Tuned’s PathoGin is made from a barley base and contains more citrus and floral flavors than most mass-market gins. Its rye and single malt whiskys will both be ready in time for the holiday shopping season.

Music at Marty's Market
The folks at Marty's Market are forever finding new ways to make use of their outstanding space. This Friday will mark the first installment of the Music at Marty's series, which will feature local Latin musician Geña. The event will run from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and include music, freshly prepared Latin cuisine and a Q&A with the musician. Tickets are $15 and may be purchased on the market's website.
 
Cocktail viewing party
Hey Bartender,” Douglas Tirola’s documentary examining New York City’s craft cocktail culture through the eyes of two skilled mixologists, will screen tomorrow at 7 p.m. at Downtown’s Harris Theater as a part of the Three Rivers Film Festival.

Writer: Matthew Wein
Sources: Bill Larkin, LeeAnn Sommerfeld

Aspinwall breaks ground on new riverfront park

When planning the groundbreaking for the new Aspinwall Riverfront Park, park developer Susan Crookston wasn’t aiming to create a corporate photo opportunity. She wanted to involve all the locals who’d volunteered their time and donated their money.

So when area residents gathered at the site of the future park on Saturday, anyone who wanted to help break ground had the chance.

“We didn’t want to have guys in suits standing around with shovels,” Crookston says. “Everyone got a shovel we’d painted gold and we planted 2,000 bulbs. It was great to see the kids running around, throwing dirt and eating cookies.”

It’s that kind of joy, Crookston says, which has helped get this park project moving so quickly. After finalizing designs in May, construction on the park’s west side, which will include walking trails and quiet recreation areas, will go on throughout the winter.

“We’ve had people really give in sacrificial ways. So many people have been involved in making this happen,” she says. “It takes most communities ten years to build a park, and we’re on two and well under way.”

While the first phase of construction is taking place, park leaders plan to erect a temporary ice skating rink next month and hope to have it ready for use by January. Right now, they’re seeking donations of ice skates. The park’s second phase, an active recreation space, could even begin concurrent to its first — something Crookston says is a matter of obtaining permits and the final 30 percent of the funding required.

If the local eagerness to get the park up and running is any indication, it won’t be long. At the groundbreaking, a child handed Crookston a bag containing $3.27.

“He knew he was building the park,” Crookston says. “When you think about somebody giving you what they’ve saved, that’s an important gift.”

Writer: Matthew Wein
Source: Susan Crookston

Small Business Saturday highlights local retailers

A lot has changed in Downtown Pittsburgh since Jeff Izenson’s grandfather opened Specialty Luggage in 1944.

The store has moved twice, occupying three different buildings within the same block of Liberty Avenue. It’s opened satellite locations in the Waterworks and South Hills Village. Oh, and big-box stores and the internet have completely changed the way people shop for nearly everything — including luggage — to the point where a lot of old, family-owned small businesses haven’t survived.

Three years ago, piggybacking on the growing movement encouraging local shopping, American Express created and promoted Small Business Saturday — a shopping event situated between the utter madness of Black Friday and server-crashing traffic of Cyber Monday — reminding consumers that sometimes, it’s nice to examine something before buying it. It’s been a boon to small businesses like Izenson’s, which thrive by offering a level of customer service big box stores and the Internet can’t compete with.

“We spend an inordinate amount of time training our people on how to take care of our customers,” Izenson says. “Providing a great experience is the most important thing we do every day. At the end of the day, my business exists because of a staff that cares about its customers.”

While Small Business Saturday is an American Express creation which encourages both stores and cardholders to register beforehand for certain perks and rewards, the Small Business Administration has set up guides for both shoppers and small business owners to foster shopping locally — something Pop City heartily endorses.

For a full list of small, locally owned businesses in your area officially taking part in Small Business Saturday, check out the official website.

Writer: Matthew Wein
Source: Jeff Izenson

PCRG initiative seeks to revive housing in Pittsburgh's Sheraden neighborhood

Originally built as one of Pittsburgh’s first working-class developments, Sheraden has seen better days. But if a Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group initiative pays off, better days are still to come.

“You kind of have this perfect storm situation where you had this steady population decline, and when the housing bubble burst, Sheraden was hit harder than any other neighborhood in Pittsburgh,” says the PCRG’s Steve Novotny.

The PCRG chose Sheraden — an historic but declining neighborhood in West Pittsburgh — as the pilot for its Reimagining Communities initiative last year. The initiative, which includes partnerships with NeighborWorks Western PA and Rebuilding Together Pittsburgh, is taking a multi-faceted approach toward reversing property divestment in one of Pittsburgh’s most overlooked neighborhoods.

PCRG's help, the Pittsburgh Housing Development Corporation has acquired a number of vacant and foreclosed properties with the ultimate goal of bringing them up to standard and putting them back on the market.

“At a given time you’ve got about 180 vacant sturctures out of about 900 – about a 20 percent rate. The big take away from that is that over the last few years, only about 20 have been for sale,” Novotny says. “What we’re doing is trying to collect data on the property in the neighborhood, and figure out what’s keeping these properties from being on the market.”

In addition to rehabbing homes and collecting information about how to best move forward, the initiative offers Sheraden residents access to financial education workshops and resources. In doing this, PCRG hopes not only to keep current residents from avoiding foreclosure, but build their financial literacy and personal wealth, in addition to offering free repairs for elderly residents’ homes.

“It helps support our work in the neighborhood in addressing these issues and trying to reactivate the housing market,” Novotny says. “The housing stock is largely still intact. It’s a good mix of older, worker-style and mixed-income housing, and a lot of the homes have front and back yards and off-street parking.”

Writer: Matthew Wein
Source: Steve Novotny

Eat + Drink: A new Downtown spot from Spoon, bottles of rum and much more

Spoon chefs preview dishes for new Downtown restaurant
Grit & Grace, the new Downtown venture from Spoon Executive Chef Brian Pekarcik and Chef de Cuisine Curtis Gamble, previewed several new dishes during No Menu Monday this week at Bar Marco. We sampled the pickled dates with apple, pear and manchego cheese, the dim sum trio comprised of Hamachi sashimi, Ahi tuna crab rolls and soba noodles with shitake mushrooms and orange-chili vinaigrette, and a salmon entrée served with crispy pretzel bread pudding, braised cabbage and pickled mustard seeds.

The pork larb and curried goat also went over extremely well. Grit & Grace, which will occupy the space at 535 Liberty Avenue formerly held by Taste of Dahntahn, plans to open next month.

The perfect gift for your favorite rum drinker
As we hinted at in an item last week, Maggie’s Farm Rum, Pittsburgh’s newest hand-crafted spirit, will be available to the public for bottle sales only the day after Thanksgiving. Made from Turbinado sugar cane, the French West Indies-style white rum will retail for $28 per bottle.

After Black Friday, Maggie’s Farm will go back to dealing exclusively with local bars and restaurants until owner Tim Russell finishes construction on the distillery’s tasting area and cocktail bar.

Oysters all over
Oysters are all the rage right now and there’s no shortage of places to get them:

Mullaney’s Harp & Fiddle
in the Strip District will host the 10th annual Guinness Oyster Festival on Saturday starting at noon. In addition to fresh oysters on the half-shell, the menu will feature fried oysters and oyster stew.

Salt of the Earth
, Kevin Sousa’s flagship eatery in Garfield, has been serving different varieties of oysters on the half-shell as a part of its Tuesday late-night menu since May. The best part? They’re only a dollar apiece.

Recently opened in East Liberty, Bar Marco offshoot The Livermore is now offering an oyster happy hour from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Like Salt’s, they’re only a dollar each.

Yiddish food? Where else?!
Nu, the modern Jewish bistro from the owners of Pamela’s, is now open for lunch and dinner service at 1711 Murray Avenue in Squirrel Hill. We stopped by for lunch last week and found an absolute revelation in the smoked brisket chili, served with sour cream, shredded cheese and pickled red onions.

The Jewbano — a sandwich featuring thick-cut corned beef, brisket and fried pickles among other things, was delicious, as was our half of the salmon burger topped with lox and capers.

The matzo ball soup was a little on the salty side, but be warned: Nu has taken a side in the light and fluffy versus heavy and dense knaidlach debate, entrenching itself firmly on the side of matzo balls which will sink right to the bottom.

Writer: Matthew Wein
Source: Tim Russell

The Brew Gentlemen plant roots in Braddock

In the great tradition of what Braddock once was, Asa Foster and Matt Katase are out to build something.

“Braddock’s not going to be back to what it was, but it will reinvent itself as something else,” Katase says. “We want to be a part of that.”

Foster and Katase, who met during their freshman year at Carnegie Mellon and became fast friends, started brewing their own beer three years ago while college juniors. Last year, they took over the space at 512 Braddock Avenue and set about — quite literally — building The Brew Gentlemen Beer Company.

Katase recalls showing the space to his brother last year around Thanksgiving.

“I unlocked the door and said, ‘this is where it’s going to be!’ and it was, well, not a disaster, but the remains of what was once an electrical supply store.”

Though they’ve taken a break from actually brewing to physically construct their brewery — they’re doing nearly all of the renovations themselves — they’ve already developed and tested a number of recipes, including four flagship beers which they plan to keep on tap year-round.

Foster, a Boston native, and Katase, who hails from Hawaii, envision their space as a large, serene and inviting area, full of exposed brick and wood, and moving at a different pace than most breweries.

“We are definitely looking to bring something to the Pittsburgh beer market that doesn’t already exist,” Foster says. “We want to have a more café kind of vibe in that we want people to feel comfortable with it as a hangout space, not just a tasting space.”

“Come in and read a book. Come in and get some work done. Nobody’s going to rush you out of your seat just because you’re taking up a barstool,” Katase added.

“It’s a manifestation of our brand, and we want that to be reflective of what our beer is,” Foster says. “It’s the place where we have the most control over quality.”

Foster and Katase hope to start brewing again by late December or early January, and have the taproom open to the public early next year. In the meantime, they’ve had plenty of support.

“Almost every day, someone comes up to us and says something thankful or encouraging,” Katase says. “People are psyched to see young people doing things in Braddock.”

You can follow The Brew Gentlemen’s progress on their blog, Facebook and Twitter.

Writer: Matthew Wein
Sources: Asa Foster, Matt Katase

Hazelwood riverfront gets largest TIF in city history

Pittsburgh City Council has approved the largest tax-increment financing plan in the city’s history, green-lighting an $80 million plan to aid in the redevelopment of 178 acres of brownfield in Hazelwood.

Known as Almono, the site once served as the Pittsburgh hub for J&L Steel, later LTV Steel. The company’s operations were so expansive that it built what’s now known as the Hot Metal Bridge to connect its blast furnaces on both sides of the Monongahela River between Oakland and the South Side.

“One of the remarkable things about this project is the fact that four foundations came together to purchase this property so that they could pursue a mixed-use, highly sustainable project, giving them the time and the thoughtfulness to make it an example of best practice from sustainable development,” says Lisa Schroeder, president and CEO of Riverlive. “It’s a long time coming and the scale of it is really a change-maker.”

The foundations — R.K. Mellon, Benedum, McCune and the Heinz Endowments, with RIDC overseeing the development — teamed up to purchase the lot for $10 million in 2002 when it was abandoned space with obsolete infrastructure which cut the community of Hazelwood off from its riverfront. It remains a totally unused gap on the north bank of the Monogahela riverfront, but Schroeder says that should soon change with the TIF now approved.

“One of the reasons that the TIF financing is so powerful is that the site requires an investment in infrastructure,” Schroeder says, adding that development is likely to include not just residential and commercial property, but extension of the city’s riverfront parks and bike trails, as well as gateways from Hazelwood to Oakland, the South Side and Downtown.

“The existing community will be seamlessly weaved into the plan,” she says, adding that Hazelwood will see “urban fabric all the way to the river’s edge.”

Writer: Matthew Wein
Source: Lisa Schroeder
2124 Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts