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Summer dining goes to the dogs

It’s patio season in Pittsburgh and many residents want to enjoy the weather with the entire family—including Fido.
 
Many Pittsburgh eateries allow four-legged patrons in their outdoor seating areas. Some even provide services for your dog from drinks to dessert. In fact, Double Wide Grill is hosting the second annual Lucky’s South Side Dog Festival on Sun., June 29 from 12PM to 5PM.
 
The free South Side event (open to pups and the public) will feature a dog talent show, contests (from howling to owner/pet look alike), games and pet adoption. The Double Wide Mars location will host the first annual Lucky’s Mars Area Dog Festival on Sun., July 20.
 
Here is a list of Pittsburgh’s dog-friendly dining options.
 
Big Dog Coffee
South Side
Just as the name would suggest, dogs are invited to join their humans on the patio.
 
Bistro 19
Mt. Lebanon
Dogs are permitted on sidewalk seating.
 
Bites and Brews
Shadyside
Dogs are permitted on sidewalk seating.
 
Bruster’s Real Ice Cream
Bruster’s provides free doggy sundaes to canine patrons!
 
Cappy's Café
Shadyside
Dogs are welcome to join their humans for an al fresco meal.
 
Coca Café  
Lawrenceville
Dogs are permitted on sidewalk seating.
 
Cupka’s II
South Side
Cupka’s II provides an outdoor, pet-friendly patio.
 
Del’s Restaurant
Bloomfield              
Del’s provides an outdoor, pet-friendly patio.
 
Diamond Market Bar and Grill
Downtown
Dogs are welcome to join their humans for an al fresco meal.
 
Double Wide Grill
South Side
Double Wide’s South Side location was the first business in Allegheny County to legally provide a designated dog section. Dogs are welcome to join the family for an al fresco meal on the patio at the South Side location. The dog patio is not available at Double Wide’s Mars location.

Il Pizzaiolo
Downtown and Mt. Lebanon
Dogs are welcome to join their humans for an al fresco meal.
 
Marty’s Market
The Strip
Dogs are allowed at outdoor seating and the restaurant will provide a bowl of water for your dog.
 
Mercurio's
Shadyside
Dogs are welcome to join their humans for an al fresco meal.
 
Mullaney's Harp & Fiddle Irish Pub
The Strip
Harp & Fiddle provides an outdoor, pet-friendly patio.
 
Nine on Nine
Downtown
Dogs are allowed at outdoor seating and the restaurant will provide a bowl of water for your dog.
 
Osteria
The Strip
Not only are dogs allowed to join their humans on the patio, but dog treats are available for 50 cents!
 
Redfin Blues
Washington’s Landing
Dogs are permitted on the restaurant’s side patio.
                     
S. Aiken Bar & Grille
Shadyside
S. Aiken provides an outdoor, pet-friendly patio.
 
Shady Grove
Shadyside                      
Dogs are permitted on the restaurant’s patio.
 
Silky’s Pub
Bloomfield
Dogs are permitted at outdoor seating.
 
Social
Bakery Square
Dogs are allowed at outdoor seating and the restaurant will provide a bowl of water for your dog.
 
Square Café
Regent Square
Dogs are allowed at outdoor seating and the restaurant will provide a bowl of water for your dog.  
 

Please share your favorite dog-friendly spots in the comments!
 
Source: Double Wide Grill, BringFido.com, petfriendlyrestaurants.com, dogfriendly.com

Allegheny County granted tax credits for three affordable housing projects

The Pennsylvania Housing Finance Authority recently approved nearly $2.7 million in federal tax credits for the construction of three affordable housing projects within Allegheny County. 
 
“The need for affordable housing has grown throughout our region, even as units have disappeared,” says County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. “Working cooperatively with partners throughout the County, we have been able to provide additional housing in areas that need it. These developments, though, also are thoughtful in that services and needs residents may have are taken into consideration in the planning.”
 
The three projects include the Heidelberg Apartments, Falconhurst Neighborhood Restoration and the Serenity Ridge development in Plum.
 
ACTION Housing, Inc. and the Autism Housing Development Corporation of Pittsburgh are producing The Heidelberg Apartments development as a unique rental community of 42 units in the Borough of Heidelberg. Half of the units will be reserved for people with autism spectrum.
 
The project is also won an “Innovation in Design” award for its creative approach to affordable housing solutions. Residents will receive  transportation, employment and social services opportunities. The needs of residents with autism spectrum will be met with specialized design features.
 
The Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation is restoring Falconhurst in Wilkinsburg and 33 new units restricted to low-to-moderate-income tenants will result from the project. The development will include 10 one-bedroom apartments, 16 two-bedroom apartments and seven three-bedroom apartments along with a community room, computer facility, laundry room, storage areas and supportive services
 
The development of Serenity Ridge by S & A Homes will provide 62 townhouse units for seniors on a 15-acre site. Serenity Ridge will include 38 one-bedroom apartments and 24 two-bedroom apartments as well as a community room, computer facility, laundry room and tenant storage areas.
 
PHFA awarded $20.4 million in federal tax credits and $8.5 million in federal PennHOMES funding for 24 different developments in the Commonwealth. Those credits will be used to attract more than $185 million of private investments, will create 1,248 rental-housing units for low-to-moderate-income families and will result in 1,002 construction jobs and 745 non-construction jobs.
 
“We were happy to support and partner with the developers on these three projects and are thrilled that each was successful in receiving tax credits,” says Dennis Davin, Allegheny County Economic Development Director. “These projects not only advance the community’s plans, but also provide much needed affordable housing within our county.”

Source: County of Allegheny 

Local architect's home featured in Dwell magazine

The Lawrenceville home of Andrew Moss, president of mossArchitects, and Michelle Yanefski, an electrical engineer, is featured in the July/August issue of Dwell magazine.
 
Moss says he and his wife Yanefski sent Dwell images of the home some time ago. They are being featured in the magazine for their “budget driven,” “modern” home.
 
Moss and Yanefski designed the space together.

“We worked to have a modern home,” Moss says. He adds that it is a unique experience to design a house based on one’s own lifestyle. “It’s a great opportunity to design your own home.”
 
He explains that the materials used to build the home were distinct and reminiscent of Pittsburgh’s industrial past — for example, the house’s metal siding. Another noteworthy aspect of the Lawrenceville abode is how it’s sited, according to Moss. The house is not part of a series of row houses, like much of the neighborhood.
 
“It’s an honor,” Moss says about being featured in Dwell. “I also think it’s a great thing for Pittsburgh.”
 
In conjunction with Moss’s mention, Dwell is running a Pittsburgh City Guide online with tips from Moss. Butler Street businesses Cure and Who New? in Lawrenceville are on the list alongside Pittsburgh institutions such as the Andy Warhol Museum.  
 
 
Source: mossArchitects, Andrew Moss 

Forza Group plans multiple hotels and ice rinks in Marshall Township

Last week, the Regional Industrial Development Corporation sold 21.1 acres for $1.2 to the Forza Group of Carnegie.
 
The Marshall Township Brush Creek Road parcel will be developed into a Staybridge Suites by the InterContinental Hotels Group — which also owns Holiday Inn, Holiday Inn Express and Candlewood Suites. The hotel will offer business and recreational amenities from lodging to meeting space to access to an ice rink.
 
An article from the Pittsburgh Business Times states that Forza plans to build multiple hotels and potentially more than one ice rink on the property. Nicole Zimsky, the planning director and zoning officer for Marshall, confirms in the piece that there's an early stage plan for two or three hotels and an ice rink or two. Zimsky also notes that the rinks could accommodate youth hockey tournaments and has potential for other uses.
 
“This project offers additional business class amenities to the Thorn Hill Industrial Park companies,” says Tim White, RIDC vice president of development.
 
To accommodate development in the industrial park, RIDC has constructed about 3.6 acres of wetland and 1,300 linear of new stream channel over the past year. RIDC also supported Marshall Township in their construction of a recreational trail along the wetlands, providing trail-goers to view the wetlands and wildlife.
 
 
Source: RIDC, Pittsburgh Business Times 

Throwback Thursday: Penn Brewery

“The history of this brewery actually goes back [about] 150 years,” Linda Nyman, co-owner and marketing director at Penn Brewery, begins.       
 
The Northside brewery has seen many transformations since its founding in Deutschtown in 1848. Deutschtown was the neighborhood in Allegheny City named for its large population of German immigrants.
 
And where there were mid-19th century German immigrants, there was beer.
 
The block where Penn Brewery is located once hosted eight or nine breweries, with Ober Brothers and Eberhardt and Ober breweries calling the site of modern Penn Brewery home. Eberhardt and Ober were connected through marriage, according to Nyman.
 
In 1899, Eberhardt and Ober merged with about 20 other regional breweries. The group became known as the Pittsburgh Brewing Company — Iron City Beer’s predecessor. Beer production continued until 1952 (save a hiatus during prohibition), under such labels as E&O Pilsner and Dutch Club.
 
After 1952 the brewery was vacant, hosted a grocery for a short period of time and then fell into disrepair, Nyman says.
 
In 1989, Tom Pastorius brought Penn Brewery to its modern glory, though Nyman notes the brew house was not yet called by its modern moniker. The restaurant was known as Allegheny Brewery & Pub until 1994. 
 
“We were the first tied house [in Pennsylvania] …  since prohibition,” Nyman says of the building being a restaurant coupled with a brewery.
 
Today, several historic holdovers can still be found at Penn Brewery. Eberhardt and Ober opened three breweries on the site where Penn exists today, and three of the original E&O brewery buildings remain. These buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and boast many fascinating architectural features, according to www.pennbrew.com
 
The cobblestone beer garden was once an entrance way for horse drawn beer deliveries, the old administrative building disconnected from Penn Brewery hosts original architecture in its tiling and stairs, and perhaps the most notable historic feature is the “labyrinth” of stone caves and tunnels that was constructed to chill, or ‘lager,’ barrels of beer in the days before refrigeration.
 
Nyman says these “lagering caves” are built into the hillside and are not open to the public, though they hope to have a few inspected for modern use in the future. She adds that the caves were discovered during masonry renovation, complete with old, rotting beer barrels.
 
Aches and pains associated with Penn Brewery’s age most recently made news when a beehive was discovered in the beerhouse’s second floor offices.
 
When a final layer of walling came down during renovation last month, the brewery was abuzz. A five-foot beehive hosting 50,000 to 60,000 bees was uncovered. Luckily, the master beekeeper who removed the bees was only stung twice when evacuating them to a new home.
 
Penn Brewery has been a part of the community — brewing local beer for 166 years. This is reflected in their offerings.
 
Their website states: “Our varied menu pays tribute to the many European nationalities whose immigrants built Pittsburgh and its colorful cultural heritage.”
 
This post is part of a “Throwback Thursday” series highlighting Pittsburgh’s revitalized historic buildings. 

Source: Linda Nyman, Penn Brewery 
 

New bake shop in the Strip offers custom cakes and bacon cinnamon rolls

Dulcinea Bakeshop will open its doors Sat., June 14 in the Strip district. The bakery located at 2627 Penn Ave is next door to Savoy restaurant and one of several shops to recently find a home in the Strip on Penn Avenue toward Lawrenceville. 
 
“I think the Strip and Lawrenceville are just going to connect at some point,” Tabrina Avery, Dulcinea owner, says with a grin about the expanding neighborhood.
 
Avery, a Le Cordon Bleu Pittsburgh graduate, says she is excited to start a business in the Strip and is trying to support neighborhood shops. The bakery will offer La Prima coffee and Opening Night Catering’s Harry Ross and Jean Ross
have been helping Avery navigate opening a new business — she has a history of baking wedding cakes for the catering company.
 
Avery has worked as a baker for a couple of other Pittsburgh restaurants since she moved to the city in 2007. Dulcinea is her first independent venture.
 
 “I was a huge fan of Don Quixote as a kid, Dulcinea was the woman he fell in love with and it kind of always stuck with me,” Avery says about choosing a name for her shop.
 
Wedding cakes and cakes to order will be a part of Dulcinea’s menu.  Avery says she will have specials that change weekly and will focus on breakfast style baked goods for the menu. She says the bakery will offer savory quiches, danishes (including a cardamom flavor), pound cake, cake by the slice and even bacon cinnamon buns.
 
“My cinnamon buns are out of this world,” she says with a laugh. Avery adds that she likes to focus on pure flavors when baking. She says, “I like to take simple classics and elevate them.”
 
The grand opening will be from 10AM to 5PM Saturday.  Avery will feature her house dulce de leche cake for the occasion.
 
Source: Tabrina Avery

Giant Chess, Jenga and Connect Four are coming downtown this summer

The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership is introducing Project Pop Up: Play through its Pop Up program on Fri., June 13 in Market Square.
 
In 2012, more than 90 artists, entrepreneurs and nonprofits submitted proposals to activate downtown storefronts. Finalists were invited to “pop” into downtown for limited engagements. After the pilot year, three of the Pop Ups signed long-term leases.
 
Project Pop Up was envisioned to be replicated and its reach includes one-time events and programs to create strong public places in Downtown Pittsburgh. Previous Pop Ups have included fashion, night markets, food and nature events.
 
“As an organization we enjoy doing unique, fun things,” says Leigh White, PDP vice president of marketing and communications. “We do them to activate downtown.”
 
Project Pop Up: Play is an initiative to help relieve workday stress with a game break. On June 13 in Market Square, during lunchtime, stop by to play some cornhole, super-sized chess, life-sized Connect Four and mega Jenga.
 
“Every adult wants to play,” White says. “It doesn’t matter if you are in a suit or … work clothes.”
 
All games are free to anyone who wants to participate. The PDP is planning to pop up the games several times a week all over downtown. White calls the games “great stress relief“ and a “great way to meet people.”
 
In addition to Pop Up: Play, the PDP is also currently hosting Project Pop Up: Patio and Project Pop Up: Fashion will be back again this year on Fri., July 18 in Market Square. Last year, Pop Up: Patio was located in Strawberry Way. This year, the Patio and Play initiatives are rotating.
 
“The biggest thing for us is that we want this to be a public participation event,” says White about how Pittsburghers have the power to request where they want the games and patio in downtown.
 
The PDP wants input about where to pop up with the fun. You can suggest a location on twitter or facebook by reaching the PDP with the hashtag #PopUpPlay for the games and the hashtag #PopUpPatio for the patio — the patio is currently located at the Gateway PAT station parklet during the Three Rivers Arts Festival — you can also email the PDP with a location request at pdp@downtownpittsburgh.com.
 
Social media will also be used to announce where you can find the games next.
 
 
Source: The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership, Leigh White

Pittsburgh to host 25th annual meeting of the Intelligent Transportation Society

Last week, the Intelligent Transportation Society of America selected Pittsburgh as the host city for the 25th Annual ITS America Meeting and Exposition next year.
 
The Intelligent Transportation Society of America is the nation’s largest organization dedicated to advancing the research, development and deployment of Intelligent Transportation Systems to improve the nation’s surface transportation system. Founded in 1991, ITS America’s membership includes more than 450 public agencies, private sector companies and academic and research institutions.
 
Taking place June 1 - 3, 2015, at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in downtown Pittsburgh, the event is expected to draw more than 2,000 of the nation’s top transportation and technology policymakers, innovators and engineers, investors, researchers and business leaders to Pittsburgh to address the critical role of technology in the nation’s and region’s transportation future.
 
“ITS America is thrilled to host our 25th Annual Meeting in Pittsburgh, Pa. — a city that is at the forefront of researching and developing high-tech transportation solutions,” says Scott Belcher, president and CEO of ITS America. “Pittsburgh is leading the way in advancing technologies such as smart sensors for parking, real-time traffic and transit information, advanced vehicle and robotics technologies and smart mobility applications that are revolutionizing transportation as we know it.”
 
Nashville, Tenn. and Washington, DC have both recently hosted the annual meeting and exposition.
 
Co-hosted with ITS Pennsylvania, the 2015 Annual Meeting will feature keynote speeches and panel discussions with the intelligent transportation industry’s premier thought leaders and rising stars, and provide attendees the opportunity to experience the latest transportation innovations through interactive technology demonstrations, a bustling exhibit hall, technical tours and networking events.
 
“ITS Pennsylvania is excited to have the City of Pittsburgh selected as the Annual Meeting location," says ITS Pennsylvania President Dan Corey. "With a surge of activity in recent years in university research, technology transfer and robotics, Pittsburgh is transforming itself into a center of intelligent transportation activity. There has also been a tremendous ITS focus on transportation, safety, operations and mobility issues throughout the state that we look to share with our colleagues. ITS Pennsylvania thanks ITS America for the selection and is ready to help make this meeting a success for both our organizations as well as the region.”
 
 
Source: Intelligent Transportation Society of America 

Buy a blighted lot or side yard at a discount through Allegheny County

The Allegheny County Department of Economic Development recently launched its 2014 Side Yard and Blighted Structure Program through its Vacant Property Recovery Program. The initiative provides an opportunity for individuals, businesses, nonprofits or government entities to apply for vacant and uncared for lots at a discounted price to the applicant.
 
“Over the past five years, the Vacant Property Recovery Program has played an integral part in revitalizing and redeveloping our neighborhoods by working with applicants to convey vacant, blighted properties for use as side yards, to develop affordable housing and for other uses such as parks, green space and commercial and residential property,” says Allegheny County executive Rich Fitzgerald. “We are proud that the program was recognized this year as a recipient of the 2014 Governor’s Award for Excellence and are thrilled to be able to provide the Side Yard program for a second year.”
 
Cassandra Collinge, manager of housing development for the Allegheny County Department of Economic Development, says the Vacant Property Recovery Program has been around since the ‘90s but has gained popularity in the past five years.
 
Collinge explains that the Vacant Property Recovery Program is an applicant driven process to reuse the county’s blighted buildings and properties. A property is generally deemed blighted when it is tax delinquent for three years. She says the venture helps to create clean titles for the deserted plots.
 
The abandoned land may be attractive to individuals and organizations for various reasons. Collinge says people may want to absorb a side yard, or delinquent structure adjacent to their home or business, to expand their yard, create additional parking or simply have something nicer next door. 
 
Properties have also been used as the site of a new structure, park or memorial. Collinge notes that there’s a veterans’ memorial park in Heidelberg on land granted through the project.
 
Allegheny County will accept applications to acquire vacant properties in 28 of the county’s 44 municipalities at a reduced cost to the applicant through the special 2014 Side Yard and Blighted Structure Program. 
 
This program is available in Braddock Hills, Carnegie, Collier, Coraopolis, Dravosburg, Etna, Forward, Glassport, Green Tree, Harrison, Heidelberg, Liberty, McCandless, Moon, Munhall, North Fayette, North Versailles, O’Hara, Oakdale, Penn Hills, Plum, Ross, Scott, Turtle Creek, West Homestead, West Mifflin, Whitaker and Wilkins.
 
Applications must be submitted no later than Aug. 30, 2014. Up to 60 applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-serve basis; only five applications will be accepted per municipality to ensure that all municipalities and residents have an opportunity to apply. Applicants must be current on taxes, water, sewage and refuse bills on all properties owned in Allegheny County and cannot have any outstanding code violations or municipal liens on any properties.
 
“We’ve been fortunate to see this program grow over the past year with 10 municipalities joining in 2013, and another three joining since the beginning of the year," says Dennis Davin, director of economic development. "From 2012 through 2013, we received over 240 applications, accepted 135 properties and conveyed 119 parcels. In addition to eliminating visual blight, the program improves the safety of neighborhoods, returns properties to the tax rolls, eliminates maintenance costs to municipalities and encourages community reinvestment.”
 
Discounts similar to the 2014 Side Yard and Blighted Structure Program are available through the Vacant Property Recovery Program on an ongoing basis in the other 16 municipalities — where it is standard on a rolling basis to underwrite or assist in costs. These municipalities are Braddock, East Pittsburgh, Homestead, McKees Rocks, Millvale, Mount Oliver, North Braddock, Pitcairn, Rankin, Sharpsburg, Stowe, Swissvale, Tarentum, Verona, Versailles and Wilkinsburg. Funding for the program is provided through Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, County general funds and applicant payments towards acquisition costs.
 
“[The project] ends up having a very positive impact on the community from a tax stand point and improving visual blight,” Collinge said.
 
For additional information, or to request an application, please contact 412-350-1090.

Source: Allegheny County, Cassandra Collinge                                                      

Try Vinyasa flow or the Grape Vine this summer in Market Square

The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership and Lululemon recently launched Yoga in the Square, a free yoga practice which will be held every Sunday in Market Square throughout the summer. The series kicked off Sun., June 1.
 
“Yoga in the Square is a unique, new and healthy way to experience downtown,” says Jeremy Waldrup, president and CEO of the PDP. “We look forward to many yoga practitioners from around the city enjoying the urban oasis that is Market Square. We hope following practice, visitors will stick around and enjoy brunch and a great Bloody Mary at one of downtown’s delicious brunch venues.”
 
Each week, a different yoga instructor will lead the class geared toward yogis of all levels — from beginner to expert. Teachers from studios throughout the city will offer people the opportunity to sample a variety of yoga experiences.
 
Leigh White, PDP vice president of marketing and communications says Market Square offers myriad events, including those like Yoga in the Square that promote health. She says the yoga series is intended to get people active and downtown.

“We are really encouraging people [of all yoga levels] to come down and give it a try,” she says, calling herself a “yoga novice” who herself will be trying something new.
 
The inaugural practice was led by Wendy Foster Elliot of Salt Power Yoga last Sunday and Dezza Pastor of the Yoga Hive will teach the session this Sun., June 7.
 
The hour-long yoga session begins at 10AM and will occur every Sunday through August 24. Yoga will be dependent upon weather. Lululemon and the PDP will provide notification by 8AM on Sundays with weather cancellations listed on the event Facebook page and on the PDP social media outlets, www.facebook.com/DowntownPittsburgh and Twitter @downtownpitt.
 
White says the PDP is also excited about the program because it gives residents the opportunity to start their Sundays downtown. She adds that she hopes Yoga in the Square can become part of a Sunday morning ritual.
 
However, if you're more into cutting a rug than hitting the yoga mat, Market Square is also hosting Dancing in the Square every Friday afternoon throughout June from 5PM to 7PM
 
The PDP and the Pittsburgh Chapter of USA Dance have partnered to bring ballroom dancing to Market Square. Dancing in the Square will feature free ballroom dancing instruction, as well as performances by students and professionals from local dance studios.
 
Similar to Yoga in the Square, Dancing in the Square will rotate instructors and feature various styles of dance. In addition to traditional ballroom dances, favorite group dances such as the Electric Slide, Cha Cha Slide and the Cupid Shuffle will be taught and danced each week.
 
This Fri., June 6, instructor Chris Drum with DJ Brian Lee, will kick off the series. Performances by the Chris Drum Dance Team and USA Dance Pittsburgh Youth from the Woodland Hills High School Youth Program will follow the class.
 
“USA Dance is happy to share the excitement of dance in the heart of downtown Pittsburgh. There will be dance lessons in Market Square, along with performances by Yes, You Can Dance!, Woodland Hills School Youth Program and Embrace Dance [Project] — designed for amputees with prosthetics,” says Ramona Corey, of USA Dance Pittsburgh.
 

Source: The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership, Leigh White

Rustbuilt and Citiparks team up to bring Squirrel Hill its first farmers market

The new Squirrel Hill Farmers’ Market debuted in the parking lot that runs from Bartlett Street to Beacon Street — directly behind the old Gulliftys — last weekend on Sun., June 1.
 
City Councilman Corey O’Connor cut the ribbon Sunday, marking the official opening of Squirrel Hill’s first farmers market and Citiparks’ first weekend farmers market.
 
The Squirrel Hill Farmers’ Market is a unique partnership between Citiparks and RustBuilt, a nonprofit working to nurture next-generation entrepreneurship and innovation in Pittsburgh and throughout the Rust Belt.
 
Nearly a thousand people wandered through, according to Alec Rieger, executive director at RustBuilt. He said vendors were almost completely sold out by noon — and the market runs from 9AM to 1PM
 
“I would say it was a really big success,” Rieger says. 
 
Featuring more than 20 vendors, Rieger says produce and food products “run the gamut.” He says the market offers high end organic food, mixed organics, prepared food, cheese, meat, baked goods, Italian ice, artisan vinegar and, he joked, no market would be complete without kettle corn.
 
“Meaningful public health and environmental arguments aside, this market is both a community development and economic development initiative, with the overarching goal of leveraging the neighborhood’s human capital, in order to create greater communal connection, cohesiveness, and commerce in Squirrel Hill and beyond,” says Rieger about the event.
 
He adds that the market fosters public health, environmental consciousness and, most importantly, community. Rieger says he hopes the market is a space where one does “not just grab your broccoli and go.” He says he wants people and families to sit and stay awhile. 
 
To create a neighborhood atmosphere, the market will begin hosting music as early as this weekend and hopes to have crafts and activities for children in the future.
 
The Squirrel Hill Farmers’ Market is also partnering with local social service agencies to provide market access to nearby homebound elderly and will accept EBT and FMNP vouchers.
 
The market will be open from 9AM to 1PM every Sunday through the end of November.
 
Source: Alec Rieger, RustBuilt

Mayor Peduto launches initiative to bolster immigration

Last week, Mayor William Peduto launched Welcoming Pittsburgh, an effort to improve quality of life and economic prosperity for immigrants and native-born residents alike.
 
Peduto announced the program Wed., May 28, with more than 100 community leaders in attendance at the Kingsley Association in Larimer. The initiative is part of Welcoming America, a national and grassroots-driven collaborative that promotes mutual respect and cooperation between foreign-born and U.S.-born Americans.

The ceremony included community leaders who spoke to their own immigrant stories and performances by Balafon West African Dance Ensemble and local, Latin American music group Bésame.

Through Welcoming Pittsburgh, the city will support efforts such as resettling refugees eager to build new homes in the city; working with organizations including the Allegheny Conference on Community Development, Global Pittsburgh and Vibrant Pittsburgh to support efforts that keep international students in the city; reviving its Sister Cities program with the help of the World Affairs Council; and supporting job growth of all kinds, from small businesses to manufacturing to high-tech.

“Pittsburgh has long been home to generations of immigrants — it drew my family here and so many others — but there is much more we can do, especially in supporting business opportunities and innovation among all our residents, old and new. While we celebrate our immigrant past, we need to build on a welcoming future,” Peduto says.

Studies show Pittsburgh lags behind most peer cities in net immigration, yet the immigrants it does host are among the highest-educated in the nation. As of early 2013, the city had more than 1,300 Bhutanese, nearly 500 Burmese, almost 200 Iraqi and more than 260 Somali citizens who resettled in Pittsburgh. The landscape is also changing for the region’s Latinos — across the county, there are 24,000 Hispanics, most of which live in the city.

June is Immigrant Heritage Month, and speakers at the Welcoming Pittsburgh event talked about the Global Great Lakes conference coming to the city June 12, and a regional Puerto Rico outreach strategy that includes a concert by El Gran Combo on June 22. Both are free events and open to the public.

“It was our great honor to host Mayor Peduto’s kickoff of Welcoming Pittsburgh,” says CEED Executive Director Rufus Idris. “As an immigrant from Nigeria and someone who works directly with this population, I see firsthand every day the numerous contributions the immigrant community is making in Pittsburgh through innovative startups and new business ventures.”

The city is currently taking applications for those seeking to join a Welcoming Pittsburgh Advisory Council to contribute to the rollout the effort’s implementation plan and set key initiatives. Policies will be shaped with the guidance of this core team. The Council will also be tapped to lead a listening tour to engage community members every step of the way. 

Those interested in joining the Welcoming Pittsburgh Advisory Council may apply at: http://pittsburghpa.gov/personnel/jobs/pittsburgh_advisory_council.  The application will remain open until June 20.
 

Source: Office of Mayor William Peduto
 

4th Annual Community Development Summit held downtown

“In Detroit and across the country, we look to Pittsburgh for hope,” Detroit native and Local Initiatives Support Corporation Vice President, Anika Goss-Foster, remarked at the reception of Pittsburgh's 4th Annual Community Development Summit.

About 600 community leaders from Pennsylvania and surrounding states convened in the grandeur of the Omni William Penn Hotel to learn about and discuss community development this week. The two day event centered on the theme of “Reaching Across Boundaries” and aimed to break down jurisdictional, sectoral and interpersonal barriers for the betterment of the community.

The Pittsburgh Community Reinvestment Group (PCRG) partnered with the Urban Land Institute to host the summit. PNC Bank has been the title sponsor of the summit for the past three years.

Participants were able to engage with different concepts of community development through mobile workshops, breakout sessions, keynote speakers and networking events.

For instance, one breakout session featured a panel of entrepreneurs and community planners who focused on the relationship between creativity and community development.

Janera Solomon, the Executive Director of the Kelly Strayhorn Theater, emphasized the importance of making culture and creativity an integral part of everyday life and taking a more thoughtful approach at utilizing creativity.

In another workshop, developers and engineers exhibited the value of integrating industrial land use into community development and addressed the challenges that accompany ventures such as zoning, physical development and feasibility issues.

Katie Hale, the Neighborhood Policy Manager of PCRG, says that the summit is about celebration and optimism. The event aims to inspire and motivate participants to make positive changes themselves.

“We want participants to leave with a tenacity to go into their communities or neighborhoods and think outside of the box and collaborate,” Hale says.

According to her, the mobile workshops mix fun with hands on experience and allow leaders to learn about their neighbors while witnessing young people making things happen in Pittsburgh.

During the event, PCRG hosted an award ceremony that recognized community leaders. The Ballfield Farm, a community farm in Perry Hilltop, was among the award recipients in the “homegrown” category. The farm has brought fresh produce to Perry Hilltop and also runs an ecology program to educate children on the process of growing food.

Joanna Deming, a member of the summit planning committee and a board member of PCRG, volunteers at Ballfield Farm with her husband.

“I submitted Ballfield Farm because I feel like it’s a little known gem on the North Side where people are working hard and benefiting from their experience in many different ways,” Deming says.

Deming says that the Community Development Summit gives Pittsburgh positive exposure.

“It’s meant to attract people from different cities and different states so one of the things it does is raise the profile of Pittsburgh,” she says.

In addition, the PCRG annually gives a Neighborhood Leader Award in memory of Bob O’Connor. This year, Reverend Tim Smith, the executive director of Center of Life, received the award for his devotion to the community of Hazelwood.

On Thursday, participants enjoyed both a breakfast and lunch keynote. During breakfast, Shelley Poticha, the director of the Natural Resources Defence Council's Urban Solutions Program, emphasized the need for environmental and community goals to converge.

"People are aware that we can actually intervene. We can make a change," Poticha says.

David Rusk, the former mayor of Albuquerque, presented the lunch keynote. He spoke of the benefits of less fragmented or “big box” states in comparison to Pennsylvania’s current “little box” make up and proposed a plan for more communal action.

Mayor Bill Peduto presented a speech before the breakfast keynote on Thursday morning and moderated a panel of experts entitled “Shaping the Cities of Tomorrow” later in the day.

Hale says that though the Community Development Summit has received gracious remarks from public officials in the past, this is the first time this caliber of public official was so actively engaged in the event.

Aggie Brose, the chair of the PCRG board, praised Mayor Peduto before his speech.

"We are very fortunate to have a leader with so much vision and optimism in our mayor," Brose says.

Mayor Peduto spoke of the importance of advancing all of Pittsburgh's neighborhoods through the revitalization of housing and business districts.

"Every community and every community group has the ability to get it done," Peduto says.

New brewery opens in Braddock

A new brewery is opening in Braddock, Wednesday. Two Carnegie Mellon grads are the brain children behind The Brew Gentlemen, opening in the former Halco Electric Supply store at 512 Braddock Ave. Matt Katase and Asa Foster created their first beer in the garage of their fraternity house and have been working toward this day ever since.

"We were both kinda unsure about pursuing careers on the tracts we were on," says Katase, originally of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. "Beer seemed like a happy medium that allowed us to wear multiple hats. So far, no two days have been the same."

Since 2010, Katase and Foster have poured all of their time and resources into creating both a brewery and a tap room to brew and sell their beer. They both changed their majors, Katase from math to operations research and entrepreneurship and Foster from art to digital media and fabrication. Katase took an independent study and worked with a mentor to build The Brew Gentlemen business plan.

After a successful Kickstarter campaign, which raised $32,118, they were off to the races, building their brewery and perfecting their recipes with their own four hands.

They chose to open their brewery in Braddock because they loved the energy of the small city and could see its potential.

"Intially when we were writing the business plan and working on all of that our entrepreneurship professor made us choose three potential locations," Katase says. "Braddock was kind of an afterthought. Asa mentioned it because he had taken a class called Mapping Braddock and spent a lot of time down here and was drawn to the energy. In senior year we spent a morning walking around and after that, it had to be in Braddock."

That first beer, brewed back in 2010 is called White Sky, a wheat beer brewed with chai tea spices. They jokingly call it their "year round seasonal," because it evokes a different seasonal sense memory for everyone who tastes it. They've gone on to produce several beers with clever, regional names such as General Braddock.

In Feb. of this year they hired master brewer Brandon Capps who has chops from working as an Anheuser Busch/InBev
systems and processes engineer.

And what about the name?

"It started as kind of a joke," Katase says. "Both Asa and I were in the same frat, Sigma Alpha Epsilon and the frat motto is 'The true gentlemen.' After trying our beer one of our other friends joked and called us 'the brew gentleman.'"

Tomorrow beginning at 4PM The Brew Gentlemen are holding their grand opening, where they'll sell growlers and pints and the mac n' cheese food truck, Mac and Gold, as well as Street Foods will be on hand for grub.

Source: The Brew Gentlemen, Matt Katase.

Throwback Thursday: Dome sweet dome

Have family or friends coming to visit Pittsburgh? Don’t have the space to put them up? Recommend a stay in Pittsburgh’s “Igloo,” available on airbnb.com.
 
“Is it a spaceship? A yurt? A tent? No, it's a Yaca-Dome! And it's not just any old Yaca-Dome. It's the original Yaca-Dome! But we just call it ‘The Igloo,’” the airbnb profile for the states.
 
But, what is a Yaca-Dome?
 
According to the lodging website, the home was built in 1969 by Pittsburgh native Joseph Yacoboni, who received a US Patent in 1975 for the construction method. Yacoboni had a vision that the design would be the way of the future. 
 
This original Olivant Place dome in the Lincoln–Lemington–Belmar neighborhood was Yacoboni’s private home, according to a 2010 article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. The article also claims that a tree once grew in the center of the circular dome. 
 
The airbnb page explains that the house was designed to withstand earthquakes and hurricanes. “Not something we here in the 'Burgh normally have to worry about,” the listing reassures. This innovative design was featured in the January 1975 issue of Popular Science.
 
Yacoboni and his wife Carmel moved to Florida and built more Yaca-Domes. His personal website discusses his vision of utilizing the design for emergency buildings, panels on space stations, pop-up shelter for the homeless and a community of domes.
 
Yacoboni passed away in 2011 at the age of 89; and though his designs may not have made it to the moon, Pittsburgh still boasts first Yaca-Dome.
 
The igloo has had many visitors. The airbnb profile has more than a dozen positive reviews from those pleased with their stay in the three bedroom, 1,250 square foot home.  One reviewer called it “a gem.”
 
Another review praised, “We love our dome away from home.”
 
Source: airbnb.com, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, josephyacoboni.com
 
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