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Shadyside


Located in a central plateau of the East End, Shadyside was one of the wealthy's first escapes from the central city, when the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks which now accommodate the East Busway made this possible. Among its stately homes are two important houses of worship: Rodef Shalom Synagogue, whose congregation played a role in the formation of Reform Judaism, and the prestigious Shadyside Presbyterian Church, so strongly associated with Pittsburgh's Establishment that it was the site of protests during the mill closures of the 1980s. In the 1960s, it's said that Shadyside's Walnut Street was a bohemian haven. Today, the tooled leather boots and beaded tops are more likely to bear a famous label, as upscale chains and designer boutiques have replaced hippie hangouts. Did you see it in Vogue? You can probably buy it on Walnut while communing with your fellow Vogue readers. Walnut's prosperity has been so plentiful that it's spilled over to the Ellsworth Avenue and Highland Avenue business districts.

Shadyside residents can quickly travel to many locations by heading to the East Busway's Negley Station for express bus service. Lots of local service is also available. On Centre Avenue, there's the 71A and 71C (Downtown via Oakland), 82 (Downtown via the Hill District) and 86 (Downtown via Bloomfield and the Strip District). Ellsworth Avenue is served by the 75 Ellsworth, which connects Bakery Square and SouthSide Works via Oakland. On Fifth Avenue, residents can get to Oakland and Downtown by taking the 71B or 71D. The 64 provides crosstown service to Lawrenceville, Bloomfield, Squirrel Hill and the Waterfront via Negley Avenue.



For more info about Shadyside visit the Pop City:
- Visitor's Guide
- Moving Guide
- Investing & Business Guide

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